Michele Kearney's Nuclear Wire

Major News and Commentary Military and Civilian Nuclear Activities

Saturday, February 5, 2011

As New START Enters into Force, Challenges Ahead Are Even More Challenging

As New START Enters into Force, Challenges Ahead Are Even More Challenging

The U.S. and Russia are expected to launch the next stage of reduction negotiations, but even setting the agenda is an almost insurmountable obstacle.

Waiting for Nuclear Disaster?

Waiting for Nuclear Disaster?

Friday, February 4, 2011

Texas Power Blackouts and Green Energy

Texas Power Blackouts and Green Energy

from The Nuclear Green Revolution

Russian Scientists Worried Iran Uses Their Know-How for Missiles

Russian Scientists Worried Iran Uses Their Know-How for Missiles

US commerce secretary eyes military, nuclear deals in India news



US commerce secretary eyes military, nuclear deals in India news

Japan is keen on completing foreign nuclear deals

Japan is keen on completing foreign nuclear deals
The Japanese government is ramping up negotiations to finalize nuclear-cooperation agreements with India, South Africa, Turkey and Brazil. The country may hold similar talks with Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia and Thailand, having completed deals with seven other countries. The Denki Shimbun (Japan)
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WikiLeaks cables: planned US missile shield blind to nuclear weapons

WikiLeaks cables: planned US missile shield blind to nuclear weapons

US plans for a missile defence system on Czech soil ran into trouble when defence chiefs realised the proposed radar was blind to nuclear missiles, leaked diplomatic cables show.

Obama’s Blocking Of New Power Plants Triggers Nationwide Blackouts

Obama’s Blocking Of New Power Plants Triggers Nationwide Blackouts



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The Dangers of a Nuclear Iran

Thursday, February 3, 2011

Iran two years from building nuclear weapon: IISS

Iran two years from building nuclear weapon: IISS

Russia, Ukraine draw up joint nuclear fuel production draft deal

Russia, Ukraine draw up joint nuclear fuel production draft deal

Australia's energy minister: Nuclear is a "clean-energy technology"

Australia's energy minister: Nuclear is a "clean-energy technology"
Australia could start considering nuclear energy during the next four years, Energy Minister Martin Ferguson said. He said the government will advance efforts to develop other sources of baseload electricity, but nuclear is a proven "clean-energy technology." The Australian

Minnesota Senate votes to end nuclear moratorium

Minnesota Senate votes to end nuclear moratorium
Minnesota's Senate voted in favor of lifting a moratorium on the construction of nuclear plants. "I believe very strongly that Minnesota should not move into the future with one hand tied behind their back," said Senate Majority Leader Amy Koch, a chief sponsor of the measure. The state's House of Representatives is scheduled to address the repeal this month. Star Tribune (Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.)

NRC chairman says Yucca Mountain closeout to include license panel

NRC chairman says Yucca Mountain closeout to include license panel

Westinghouse nuclear reactor set to advance at NRC

NRC is seeking comments on AP1000 reactor design
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will seek the public's input on whether to approve Westinghouse Electric's AP1000 reactor design, said Gregory Jaczko, chairman of the NRC. Southern Co. and SCANA are planning to use the design for their respective expansion projects in Georgia and South Carolina. The NRC could award construction licenses to both companies this year if the design is cleared, Jaczko added. Reuters

COMMENT: Energy efficiency, climate crisis, and nuclear energy: Russia’s Medvedev in Swiss Davos


COMMENT: Energy efficiency, climate crisis, and nuclear energy: Russia’s Medvedev in Swiss Davos

Westinghouse nuclear reactor decision expected in late summer Energy Business Review

Westinghouse nuclear reactor decision expected in late summer
Energy Business Review

How Nuclear Fits into Obama's Ambitious Goal

How Nuclear Fits into Obama's Ambitious Goal
Americans For Energy Leadership
So, in addition to the regulatory reform proposed above, a well-developed financial-assistance system is needed for the rapid deployment of nuclear power,

Legal challenges for nuclear industry reach new levels

Legal challenges for nuclear industry reach new levels

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

China plans to spend big on nuclear power, high-speed rail

BEIJING | Tue Feb 1, 2011 8:19am EST
BEIJING (Reuters) - Nuclear power and high speed rail will top the focus of China's plan to invest $1.5 trillion in seven key industries and shift the world's number two economy away from its role as a supplier of cheap goods, sources said.
State-owned enterprises, rather than the government, will play the main role of channeling the investment, said one source with ties to the leadership.
China envisages high-end equipment manufacturing, including high-speed rail and aviation equipment, becoming a pillar of economic growth alongside energy-saving and environmentally friendly technologies, biotechnology and new generation information technology such as telecoms and the Internet.
The other strategic sectors are alternative energy, advanced materials and alternative-fuel cars.
"China needs to innovate if it is to compete against multinationals in the international arena," said Qiu Gang of the Beijing office of Samsung Economic Research Institute.
"China hopes to become an industrial giant by 2015."
It is that push by emerging economies, and China in particular, into high-end manufacturing that was seen as behind U.S. President Barack Obama's call in his speech to Congress last week for a "Sputnik moment," fed by spending in education and research, to make sure the United States does not lose its technological edge.
A source with ties to the leadership told Reuters in December that the State Council, or cabinet, is considering investing up to $1.5 trillion in the sectors. The government has not publicly stated any figure.
The amount is part of a 2011-2015 five-year plan which needs approval the National People's Congress, or parliament, which holds its annual full session in March.
Analysts have expressed skepticism over the size of the investment which equates to about 5 percent of China's gross domestic product on an annual basis.
But they say it is an indication of the government's determination to force a structural shift in the economy.

Why the Chinese Commitment to the LFTR Matters.

"Why the Chinese Commitment to the LFTR Matters."  http://nucleargreen.blogspot.com/2011/02/why-chinese-commitment-to-lftr-matters.html
This essay reviews the recent Chinese decision to develop thorium breeding molten Salt nuclear technology, and points our the high human cost of fossil fuel use in China, as well as the LFTR potential for lowering nuclear cost, and the consequences of the thorium/LFTR decision for chinese economic and political power.
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China Initiates Thorium MSR Project.

Kirk Sorensen, China Initiates Thorium MSR Project. 
http://energyfromthorium.com/2011/01/30/china-initiates-tmsr/
In this post, Kirk covers Chinese reports on their decision to institute thorium breeding Molten Salt Reactor development. 
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Obama to sign new START treaty




Washington (AFP) Feb 1, 2011 President Barack Obama will formally sign ratification papers for a new Russia-US disarmament treaty on Wednesday, which slashes existing warhead ceilings by 30 percent over the next 10 years. Officials said Obama will make the ceremonial gesture in the Oval Office, before the milestone pact comes into force on February 5 at a ceremony in Munich attended by the two nations' top diplomats.
Russian President Dmitry Medvedev signed the new START agreement's ratification on Friday after the Russian parliament passed the pact, which was endorsed by the US Senate last month.
The replacement for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) deal enters into force the moment the two sides swap their respective "instruments of ratification."
Russian diplomatic sources said the ceremony will be held during the February 4-6 Munich Security Conference -- an annual gathering of some of the world's most senior defense officials and experts.
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov are expected to preside.
The new START sets the lower warhead ceiling and limits each side to 700 deployed long-range missiles and heavy bombers, and forms one of the most significant foreign policy successes of Obama's presidency so far.
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China Takes Lead in Race for Clean Nuclear Power

China Takes Lead in Race for Clean Nuclear Power


China has officially announced it will launch a program to develop a thorium-fueled molten-salt nuclear reactor, taking a crucial step towards shifting to nuclear power as a primary energy source.
The project was unveiled at the annual Chinese Academy of Sciences conference in Shanghai last week, and reported in the Wen Hui Bao newspaper (Google English translation here).
If the reactor works as planned, China may fulfill a long-delayed dream of clean nuclear energy. The United States could conceivably become dependent on China for next-generation nuclear technology. At the least, the United States could fall dramatically behind in developing green energy.
“President Obama talked about a Sputnik-type call to action in his SOTU address,” wrote Charles Hart, a a retired semiconductor researcher and frequent commenter on the Energy From Thorium discussion forum. “I think this qualifies.”

While nearly all current nuclear reactors run on uranium, the radioactive element thorium is recognized as a safer, cleaner and more abundant alternative fuel. Thorium is particularly well-suited for use in molten-salt reactors, or MSRs. Nuclear reactions take place inside a fluid core rather than solid fuel rods, and there’s no risk of meltdown.
In addition to their safety, MSRs can consume various nuclear-fuel types, including existing stocks of nuclear waste. Their byproducts are unsuitable for making weapons of any type. They can also operate as breeders, producing more fuel than they consume.
In the 1960s and 70s, the United States carried out extensive research on thorium and MSRs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. That work was abandoned — partly, believe many, because uranium reactors generated bomb-grade plutonium as a byproduct. Today, with nuclear weapons less in demand and cheap oil’s twilight approaching, several countries — including India, France and Norway — are pursuing thorium-based nuclear-fuel cycles. (The grassroots movement to promote an American thorium power supply was covered in this December 2009 Wired magazine feature.)
China’s new program is the largest national thorium-MSR initiative to date. The People’s Republic had already announced plans to build dozens of new nuclear reactors over the next 20 years, increasing its nuclear power supply 20-fold and weaning itself off coal, of which it’s now one of the world’s largest consumers. Designing a thorium-based molten-salt reactor could place China at the forefront of the race to build environmentally safe, cost-effective and politically palatable reactors.
“We need a better stove that can burn more fuel,” Xu Hongjie, a lead researcher at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, told Wen Hui Bao.
China’s program is headed by Jiang Mianheng, son of the former Chinese president Jiang Zemin. A vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the younger Jiang holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Drexel University. A Chinese delegation headed by Jiang revealed the thorium plans to Oak Ridge scientists during a visit to the national lab last fall.
The official announcement comes as the Obama administration has committed itself to funding R&D for next-generation nuclear technology. The president specifically mentioned Oak Ridge National Laboratory in his State of the Union address Jan. 25, but no government-funded program currently exists to develop thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel.
A Chinese thorium-based nuclear power supply is seen by many nuclear advocates and analysts as a threat to U.S. economic competitiveness. During a presentation at Oak Ridge on Jan. 31, Jim Kennedy, CEO of St. Louis–based Wings Enterprises (which is trying to win approval to start a mine for rare earths and thorium at Pea Ridge, Missouri) portrayed the Chinese thorium development as potentially crippling.
“If we miss the boat on this, how can we possibly compete in the world economy?” Kennedy asked. “What else do we have left to export?”
According to thorium advocates, the United States could find itself 20 years from now importing technology originally developed nearly four decades ago at one of America’s premier national R&D facilities. The alarmist version of China’s next-gen nuclear strategy come down to this: If you like foreign-oil dependency, you’re going to love foreign-nuclear dependency.
“When I heard this, I thought, ‘Oboy, now it’s happened,’” said Kirk Sorensen, chief nuclear technologist at Teledyne Brown Engineering and creator of the Energy From Thorium blog. “Maybe this will get some people’s attention in Washington.”
While the international “Generation IV” nuclear R&D initiative includes a working group on thorium MSRs, China has made clear its intention to go it alone. The Chinese Academy of Sciences announcement explicitly states that the PRC plans to develop and control intellectual property around thorium for its own benefit.
“This will enable China to firmly grasp the lifeline of energy in its own hands,” stated the Wen Hui Bao report.
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Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Stuxnet Could Trigger Atomic Calamity, Intel Report Warns

Stuxnet Could Trigger Atomic Calamity, Intel Report Warns

China plans to spend big on nuclear power, high-speed rail

China plans to spend big on nuclear power, high-speed rail

Global Nuclear Power Industry

Global Nuclear Power Industry

Leaders of Argentina, Brazil plan nuclear energy

Leaders of Argentina, Brazil plan nuclear energy

Turkey targets 20 nuclear reactors by 2030-official

Turkey targets 20 nuclear reactors by 2030-official

Bingaman backs nuclear in US clean energy standard

Bingaman backs nuclear in US clean energy standard

U.S. Pushes, but Reactors Are Lagging By MATTHEW L. WALD

U.S. Pushes, but Reactors Are Lagging

World Can Be Powered By Alternative Energy In 20-40 Years

World Can Be Powered By Alternative Energy In 20-40 Years

The plan calls for using wind, water and solar energy to generate power, with wind and solar power contributing 90 percent of the needed energy. Geothermal and hydroelectric sources would each contribute about 4 percent in their plan (70 percent of the hydroelectric is already in place), with the remaining 2 percent from wave and tidal power.

Stanford CA (SPX) Jan 31, 2011 If someone told you there was a way you could save 2.5 million to 3 million lives a year and simultaneously halt global warming, reduce air and water pollution and develop secure, reliable energy sources - nearly all with existing technology and at costs comparable with what we spend on energy today - why wouldn't you do it? According to a new study coauthored by Stanford researcher Mark Z. Jacobson, we could accomplish all that by converting the world to clean, renewable energy sources and forgoing fossil fuels.
"Based on our findings, there are no technological or economic barriers to converting the entire world to clean, renewable energy sources," said Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering. "It is a question of whether we have the societal and political will."
He and Mark Delucchi, of the University of California-Davis, have written a two-part paper in Energy Policy in which they assess the costs, technology and material requirements of converting the planet, using a plan they developed.
The world they envision would run largely on electricity. Their plan calls for using wind, water and solar energy to generate power, with wind and solar power contributing 90 percent of the needed energy.
Geothermal and hydroelectric sources would each contribute about 4 percent in their plan (70 percent of the hydroelectric is already in place), with the remaining 2 percent from wave and tidal power.
Vehicles, ships and trains would be powered by electricity and hydrogen fuel cells. Aircraft would run on liquid hydrogen. Homes would be cooled and warmed with electric heaters - no more natural gas or coal - and water would be preheated by the sun.
Commercial processes would be powered by electricity and hydrogen. In all cases, the hydrogen would be produced from electricity. Thus, wind, water and sun would power the world.
The researchers approached the conversion with the goal that by 2030, all new energy generation would come from wind, water and solar, and by 2050, all pre-existing energy production would be converted as well.
"We wanted to quantify what is necessary in order to replace all the current energy infrastructure - for all purposes - with a really clean and sustainable energy infrastructure within 20 to 40 years," said Jacobson.
One of the benefits of the plan is that it results in a 30 percent reduction in world energy demand since it involves converting combustion processes to electrical or hydrogen fuel cell processes. Electricity is much more efficient than combustion.
That reduction in the amount of power needed, along with the millions of lives saved by the reduction in air pollution from elimination of fossil fuels, would help keep the costs of the conversion down.
"When you actually account for all the costs to society - including medical costs - of the current fuel structure, the costs of our plan are relatively similar to what we have today," Jacobson said.
One of the biggest hurdles with wind and solar energy is that both can be highly variable, which has raised doubts about whether either source is reliable enough to provide "base load" energy, the minimum amount of energy that must be available to customers at any given hour of the day.
Jacobson said that the variability can be overcome.
"The most important thing is to combine renewable energy sources into a bundle," he said. "If you combine them as one commodity and use hydroelectric to fill in gaps, it is a lot easier to match demand."
Wind and solar are complementary, Jacobson said, as wind often peaks at night and sunlight peaks during the day. Using hydroelectric power to fill in the gaps, as it does in our current infrastructure, allows demand to be precisely met by supply in most cases. Other renewable sources such as geothermal and tidal power can also be used to supplement the power from wind and solar sources.
"One of the most promising methods of insuring that supply matches demand is using long-distance transmission to connect widely dispersed sites," said Delucchi. Even if conditions are poor for wind or solar energy generation in one area on a given day, a few hundred miles away the winds could be blowing steadily and the sun shining.
"With a system that is 100 percent wind, water and solar, you can't use normal methods for matching supply and demand. You have to have what people call a supergrid, with long-distance transmission and really good management," he said.
Another method of meeting demand could entail building a bigger renewable-energy infrastructure to match peak hourly demand and use the off-hours excess electricity to produce hydrogen for the industrial and transportation sectors.
Using pricing to control peak demands, a tool that is used today, would also help.
Jacobson and Delucchi assessed whether their plan might run into problems with the amounts of material needed to build all the turbines, solar collectors and other devices.
They found that even materials such as platinum and the rare earth metals, the most obvious potential supply bottlenecks, are available in sufficient amounts. And recycling could effectively extend the supply.
"For solar cells there are different materials, but there are so many choices that if one becomes short, you can switch," Jacobson said. "Major materials for wind energy are concrete and steel and there is no shortage of those."
Jacobson and Delucchi calculated the number of wind turbines needed to implement their plan, as well as the number of solar plants, rooftop photovoltaic cells, geothermal, hydroelectric, tidal and wave-energy installations.
They found that to power 100 percent of the world for all purposes from wind, water and solar resources, the footprint needed is about 0.4 percent of the world's land (mostly solar footprint) and the spacing between installations is another 0.6 percent of the world's land (mostly wind-turbine spacing), Jacobson said.
One of the criticisms of wind power is that wind farms require large amounts of land, due to the spacing required between the windmills to prevent interference of turbulence from one turbine on another.
"Most of the land between wind turbines is available for other uses, such as pasture or farming," Jacobson said. "The actual footprint required by wind turbines to power half the world's energy is less than the area of Manhattan." If half the wind farms were located offshore, a single Manhattan would suffice.
Jacobson said that about 1 percent of the wind turbines required are already in place, and a lesser percentage for solar power.
"This really involves a large scale transformation," he said. "It would require an effort comparable to the Apollo moon project or constructing the interstate highway system."
"But it is possible, without even having to go to new technologies," Jacobson said. "We really need to just decide collectively that this is the direction we want to head as a society."
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India approves $12 bln S. Korean steel plant

India on Monday gave approval to South Korea's POSCO to build a giant $12 billion steel plant, in the country's biggest foreign investment deal since the launch of market reforms in 1991.
The POSCO deal is a test case for foreign investors eager to enter the fast-growing Asian economy, but it also puts the government on collision course with locals as farmland and forests are cleared to make way for the plant.
Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh gave his clearance but attached a series of strict conditions for the 12-million-tonne capacity complex in the eastern state of Orissa which is crucial to the global expansion strategy of POSCO.
It plans to use the project to source cheap raw materials and boost output.
"Projects such as that of POSCO have considerable economic, technological and strategic significance for the country," Ramesh said, while stressing "laws on environment and on forests must be implemented seriously".
A spokesman for POSCO, South Korea's biggest steelmaker, told AFP in Seoul the company welcomed the Indian government's approval and it would now go ahead with further land purchases, suspended in August by the environment ministry.
Ramesh, who has earned a reputation as a green crusader for blocking investment projects that threaten the environment, warned that the slew of conditions on POSCO would be "closely monitored".
Among the 28 conditions for the plant are restrictions on air emissions, and rules on water sustainability and the amount of green cover.
He is also withholding over 2,000 acres (809 hectares) -- nearly half the project area -- pending assurances there are no tribal people living in the area.
Approval for a port to be built nearby by POSCO for the plant was also subject to 32 conditions, including a ban on building in high erosion zones.
A government panel had earlier found "many serious lapses and illegalities" in assessments of the plant's environmental impact and "serious violations" in the public hearing process.
Amit Mitra, secretary general of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry, said the government's clearance showed "a careful balance" between economic growth objectives and environmental protection.
Abhay Sahoo, leader of the Anti-POSCO People's Movement, which has opposed the project since it was initially agreed in 2005, said the "clearance means nothing to us."
"We're going to fight against the project -- do whatever it takes," Sahoo told AFP.
POSCO's plant was among a number of big-ticket industrial projects that have run into difficulty over environmental and other issues.
Industrialisation has long been championed by economists as a way to create double-digit economic growth in India and pull tens of millions of people out of poverty.
But across the country, acquiring land for factories has frequently created battlegrounds.
Giant steelmaker ArcelorMittal has also found itself unable to acquire land for five years for a proposed plant in eastern India.
Ramesh's push to make sure projects meet environmental standards has pitted him against big business and cabinet colleagues, including Steel Minister Virbhadra Singh, who told him to be "pragmatic, not dogmatic".
Ramesh made headlines last year by blocking plans by British resource giant Vedanta to mine bauxite in India and has put other major projects on hold, including a new hill station in western India.
The POSCO approval comes after India saw foreign direct investment decline sharply last year. The country's central bank blamed that in part on "environment-sensitive policies" that affected investor sentiment.
For 2010, FDI fell 32 percent to $24 billion at the same time as locations such as Singapore grabbed 122 percent more foreign investment at $37 billion and China drew 6.3 percent more at $100 billion, according to UN figures.
Earlier this month, POSCO reported a sharp fall in fourth-quarter net profit to 525.4 billion won ($469 million), blaming the higher cost of raw materials
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U.N. Report Suggests N. Korea Has Secret Nuclear Sites By: Chico Harlan | The Washington Post

U.N. Report Suggests N. Korea Has Secret Nuclear Sites
By: Chico Harlan | The Washington Post

Pakistani Nuclear Arms Pose Challenge to U.S. Policy By: David E. Sanger and Eric Schmitt | The New York Times

Pakistani Nuclear Arms Pose Challenge to U.S. Policy
By: David E. Sanger and Eric Schmitt | The New York Times

Stuxnet Virus Penetrates Nuclear Plant, May Cause Chernobyl-Like Disaster By: George Jahn | Los Angeles Times

Skeptical about new NRC blog

Skeptical about new NRC blog

Transparency is good, but making it a success requires more than just one way communication

Monday, January 31, 2011

The New NRC Blog

Welcome Message from the Chairman


Welcome to the new NRC Blog. We are excited about using this new communications tool and hope it will increase our collaboration and interaction with the public. The blog is intended to serve as a vehicle for informing, explaining and clarifying the actions, roles and responsibilities of the NRC, raising awareness about our agency and its mission, and – most importantly – giving us an opportunity to hear from you.
Staff from throughout the NRC will be posting regularly on the blog, addressing a variety of topics. Just to be clear, the blog is not replacing our usual modes of communicating with and getting feedback from the public. Instead, it is an additional way of communicating with you. We will continue to rely on public meetings, Federal Register notices and traditional media to convey official information.
We hope you will comment on our posts and on the comments of others. Please be sure to read the Blog Guidelines before doing so. Comments are moderated and we will review them and get them up as quickly as possible during regular business hours.
If you have questions, issues or concerns about nuclear safety or security, contracting with the NRC, or working at our agency, please use the links below to find more information:
Allegations: http://www.nrc.gov/about-nrc/regulatory/allegations/safety-concern.html.
Doing business with the NRC: http://www.nrc.gov/about-nrc/contracting.html.
Job opportunities with the NRC: http://www.nrc.gov/about-nrc/employment.html.
Welcome again to the new NRC Blog. We hope this is the beginning of a lively and engaging dialogue.
Gregory Jaczko
Chairman, NRC

White House official cites ‘education problem’ on climate

White House official cites ‘education problem’ on climate

DOE seeks four-month wait on Yucca Mountain case

DOE seeks four-month wait on Yucca Mountain case

Toshiba's U.S. Unit Faces $100 Million Gender-Discrimination Suit

Toshiba's U.S. Unit Faces $100 Million Gender-Discrimination Suit

Nuclear Energy Producer With Huge Upside Potential

Nuclear Energy Producer With Huge Upside Potential

200B Gallons of Water Drawn Each Day for U.S. Coal, Nuclear Power

New estimates put Pakistan's nuclear arsenal at more than 100

New estimates put Pakistan's nuclear arsenal at more than 100

China has started a Thorium molten salt reactor project

China has started a Thorium molten salt reactor project

The Chinese Academy of Sciences started the first one of the strategic leader in science and technology projects, "the future of advanced nuclear fission energy - nuclear energy, thorium-based molten salt reactor system" project was officially launched. The scientific goal is to use 20 years or so, developed a new generation of nuclear energy systems, all the technical level reached in the trial and have all intellectual property rights.

Sunday, January 30, 2011

China will exceeded US electricity generation in early 2011 and forecasts to 2012

China will exceeded US electricity generation in early 2011 and forecasts to 2012

Andrus blasts Idaho spend fuel R&D plan

Will China eat our lunch over the LFTR too? by Charles Barton

A couple of months ago I wrote apost titled, "Keeping up with China: The Economic Advantage of Molten Salt Nuclear Technology."  I argued that Chinese LWRs were going to come in at about 40% cheaper than reactors built i the west, and that low cost electricity would give China a huge economic advantage.  I then pointed out that Molten Salt reactors had the potential to substantually lower nuclear costs, thus offering the United States a route to energy competitivemess.  wFriday, Hua Bei who is, I believe a Chinese Scientist posted on Energy from Thorium the following comment:
"Five days ago, China just started the TMSR project in the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) annual report conference, which indicates that China has joined the international MSR club officially. Chinese TMSR project is one of the first four launched projects in 2011, as can be called the "Strategic and Leading Project of Science and Technology". Its ultimate target is to investigate and develop a whole new nuclear system ( thorium based molten salt nuclear system) in about 20 years. The website link of related reports are as follow.
http://www.cas.cn/xw/zyxw/ttxw/201101/t ... 7050.shtml
http://whb.news365.com.cn/yw/201101/t20 ... 944856.htm"

For those who do are unfamiliar TMSR stands for the European name for the LFTR.   I posted this comment on Nuclear Green, and received the following comment from horos11 "charles,

you know, I read this, and I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.

After all, this site and others have been sounding the clarion call to action on this, and I should be glad that someone finally heeded it and its getting traction in a place that really matters, but I have a sinking feeling that:

a. its going to take far less than their planned 20 years

b. they are going to succeed beyond their wildest expectations.

Which means that the next, giant sucking sound we may hear is the sound of the 5 trillion dollar energy market heading east, further depressing our economy, weakening the dollar (and the euro) and ultimately making the US economy dependent on rescue from the chinese in the future (when they are done rescuing themselves).

Yet, in the large scheme of things, this is a definite good, and may be our savior from anthropomorphic climate change.

so again, laugh? or cry. I guess its up to how you view things - I guess I'm tentatively laughing at the moment, but mostly from the overwhelming irony of all this."

- Charles Barton