Michele Kearney's Nuclear Wire

Major News and Commentary Military and Civilian Nuclear Activities

Saturday, July 16, 2011

Germany's Greens Criticize Govt. Over New Coal-Fired Power Plants

Germany's Greens Criticize Govt. Over New Coal-Fired Power Plants

Germany's Greens, buoyant following Berlin’s decision to shutter the country’s nuclear power plants in the wake of the March Fukushima nuclear catastrophe in Japan, are sharply critical of the government’s intention to underwrite the construction of new coal-fired power plants to help produce power when the nuclear power plants go offline.

In reply to Greens Bundestag group Germany’s Economics Ministry wrote in a letter, "highly efficient, flexible fossil fuel power plants that need to be built in the years 2013 to 2016 will be subsidized to the tune of 5 percent of the annual outlay from the Energy and
Read more...

ATOMIC POWER REVIEW New video: No. 2 reactor building at Fukushima Daiichi

New video: No. 2 reactor building at Fukushima Daiichi

The APR YouTube channel now has a new video posted: TEPCO has released a video for the press showing a tour (of sorts) by a robot inside the No. 2 reactor building. See it here:

APR YouTube Channel

5:40 AM Eastern Saturday July 16, 2011
ATOMIC POWER REVIEW

Nuclear Fission Power Plants and Transition to ITER and Fusion Nuclear Power

Nuclear Fission Power Plants and Transition to ITER and Fusion Nuclear Power

Hitachi wins N-plant rights / Company gains advantage over rivals for Lithuanian project

Hitachi wins N-plant rights / Company gains advantage over rivals for Lithuanian project

Workers toil under intense heat at crippled nuclear plant

Workers toil under intense heat at crippled nuclear plant
Workers are struggling under intense heat at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant with as many as 31 people having fallen sick complaining of apparent symptoms of heat stroke, according to Tokyo Electric Power Co.

NRC: Exelon Cleaning Up Chemical Leak At Illinois Nuclear Plant

NRC: Exelon Cleaning Up Chemical Leak At Illinois Nuclear Plant

Refurbishment of New Brunswick nuclear power plant inches toward completion

Refurbishment of New Brunswick nuclear power plant inches toward completion

Germany's trouble with abandoning nuclear power

Germany's trouble with abandoning nuclear power

Now that Germany is turning away from nuclear power, it is more reliant on renewable and traditional energy sources – both of which comes with problems of their own.

Japan Operator Shutting Down Nuclear Reactor After Malfunction

Japan Operator Shutting Down Nuclear Reactor After Malfunction

Global Food Security Threatened by Ocean Acidification

Global Food Security Threatened by Ocean Acidification

New science reveals fossil fuel emissions may cause declines in clam, oyster and other seafood harvests.

Renewables 2011 Global Status Report

The Renewable Energy Policy Network released their annual renewables report. Their research shows that renewable energy grew strongly in 2010, as the total global investment in renewables reached $211 billion, up 32% from the $160 billion invested in 2009.

Here are some of the highlights from the report:



  • Renewable capacity now comprises about a quarter of total global power-generating capacity  and supplies close to 20% of global electricity, with most of this provided by hydropower.

  • Developing countries (collectively) have more than half of global renewable energy power.

  • In the United States, renewables accounted for about 10.9% of U.S. domestic primary energy production (compared with nuclear's 11.3%), an increase of 5.6% over 2009.

  • Renewables accounted for about 26% of China's total installed electric capacity in 2010, 18% of generation, and more than 9% of final energy supply.

  • In the European Union, renewables represented an estimated 41% of newly installed electric capacity. While this share was significantly lower than the more than 60% of new capacity in 2009, more renewable power capacity was added in Europe than ever before.

    You can download their full report for free at: Renewables 2011 Global Status Report

  • ANS Nuclear Cafe 61st Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

    ANS Nuclear Cafe

    61st Carnival of Nuclear Energy Bloggers

    Moving beyond Fukushima – the renaissance continues

    Nuclear Roulette: new book puts a nail in coffin of nukes

    Nuclear Roulette: new book puts a nail in coffin of nukes
    by Jan Lundberg   
    Image
    Fukushima explosion
    Activists are suspicious of "studying the problem" that puts off action in favor of endless talk (or publishing). Culture Change went beyond studying the problem soon after its founding in 1988: action and advocacy must get to the root of the crises to assure a livable future. Also, information overload and a diet of bad news kills much activism. So it's hard to find reading material to strongly recommend. But the new book Nuclear Roulette: The Case Against the "Nuclear Renaissance" is must-have if one is fighting nukes today.

    Ice Wars: Burn the riches beneath melting Arctic sea

    Ice Wars: Burn the riches beneath melting Arctic sea
    by Lily Dayton   
    ImageFossil fuels are melting the Arctic, which is giving us access to more fossil fuels that will melt the Arctic more. When CNN correspondent Kaj Larsen had the opportunity to head to the North Pole to report on geopolitical events that are surfacing as global warming, causing the Arctic ice to melt, he looked to his roots to help him tell the story.

    Idaho Samizdat: Nuke Notes SEC takes another swing at AEHI

    Idaho Samizdat: Nuke Notes

    SEC takes another swing at AEHI

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    Fusion - a clean future

    Fusion - a clean future

    Removing fuel from Fukushima Nos. 3, 4 reactors to be given priority

    Removing fuel from Fukushima Nos. 3, 4 reactors to be given priority

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    Was Vermont's Lowell Mountain Wind Turbine Facility A Good Idea?

    Was Vermont's Lowell Mountain Wind Turbine Facility A Good Idea?

    Nuke export talks suspended

    http://search.japantimes.co.jp/print/nn20110716a5.html


    Nuke export talks suspended
    Kyodo

    The government will suspend talks with Brazil and four other countries
    concerning the sale of Japanese-made nuclear power equipment and technology
    after Prime Minister Naoto Kan this week called for Japan's eventual exit
    from atomic power.
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    EPR and AP1000 - Progress towards UK generic design approval

    EPR and AP1000 - Progress towards UK generic design approval

     
     
    For those who may be interested, latest update on the UK GDA process for the EPR and AP1000
     

    An IAEA perspective on Fukushima

    An IAEA perspective on Fukushima

    I recently had the pleasure to attend a lecture by Randy Beatty (who has been affiliated with the International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA] for some time), focusing upon the IAEA's perspective on Fukushima, particularly in terms of our current understanding of the sequence of events (which is still evolving) as well as the IAEA's interactions with the government of Japan and TEPCO (the owner of the Fukushima reactors).

    Below is a summary of some of the major topics covered, including a more detailed reconstruction of the accident sequence (and particular, both the relatively small timeframe in which most of the damage occurred) as well as a better understanding of how other, secondary complications such as the hydrogen explosions came about. Finally, more precise estimates of the quantities of radiation released and the direction of its spread shed some light on how many were affected and the relative appropriateness of certain evacuation precautions.

    Preview: The Thorium Dream


     
    Preview: The Thorium Dream | Motherboard
    I'm excited to show you a little of our latest feature documentary, about the growing grassroots movement in the United States behind the element thorium, ...
    www.motherboard.tv/2011/7/12/preview-the-thorium-dream

    Friday, July 15, 2011

    “Emergency declared” at New Jersey nuke plant after reactor coolant leak — “Leakage outside containment”

    “Emergency declared” at New Jersey nuke plant after reactor coolant leak — “Leakage outside containment”

    TEPCO Expects To Meet First Recovery Deadline

    TEPCO Expects To Meet First Recovery Deadline

    India, U.S. to Discuss Nuclear Export Guidelines

    India, U.S. to Discuss Nuclear Export Guidelines

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and top Indian officials are expected next week to discuss new Nuclear Suppliers Group guidelines against the export of sensitive technologies to select nations, the Times of India reported (see GSN, July 11).
    The 46-nation group in 2008 granted a special exception enabling members to engage in civilian atomic trade with India, even though the nuclear-armed South Asian state has not signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. Last month, though, the organization acted to prohibit the export of nuclear fuel enrichment and reprocessing systems to countries outside the treaty.
    Washington and other NSG members have said they remain committed to conducting nuclear business with New Delhi.

    China Violating Missile Proliferation Controls, Cables State

    China Violating Missile Proliferation Controls, Cables State

    Recently leaked U.S. diplomatic memos assert that China has flouted missile proliferation controls by selling the arms and their components to Pakistan, Iran and Syria, the Washington Times reported on Wednesday (see GSN, June 2).

    Top General: U.S. Needs Fresh Look at Deterrence, Nuclear Triad

    Top General: U.S. Needs Fresh Look at Deterrence, Nuclear Triad

    WASHINGTON -- The nation's second-ranking military officer on Thursday called for a broad reassessment of how to deter significant threats to the United States (see GSN, June 22).

    Iran Could Spread Nuclear Arms to Extremists: Expert

    Iran Could Spread Nuclear Arms to Extremists: Expert

    ASEAN Pursues Dialogue With Nuclear Powers on Nuke-Free Zone

    ASEAN Pursues Dialogue With Nuclear Powers on Nuke-Free Zone

    The Association of Southeast Asian Nations in a preliminary statement said it wants to join the five nuclear powers in official dialogue aimed at securing their endorsement of a regional nuclear weapon-free zone, Kyodo News reported on Thursday (see GSN, June 9).
    The 1995 Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone pact obligates signatories "not to develop, manufacture or otherwise acquire, possess or have control over atomic weapons," and it prohibits the storage and transfer of such armaments in ASEAN states.

    Pakistan Seeks to Join Nuclear Export Control Group

    Pakistan Seeks to Join Nuclear Export Control Group

    Pakistan wishes to join an international atomic export control group whose members agree to follow strict nonproliferation guidelines, so long as it is globally accepted as a nuclear-armed nation, the Express Tribune reported on Friday (see GSN, Jan. 16).
    The 46-member Nuclear Suppliers Group seeks to limit the sale of atomic materials and technology to nations that permit full-scale U.N. monitoring of their nuclear operations, which Pakistan does not.

    House Approves $1 Billion Cut to Nuclear Agency Funding from GSN Daily News by By Martin Matishak

    House Approves $1 Billion Cut to Nuclear Agency Funding

    from GSN Daily News

    Gazprom Seeks Expansion Into Germany’s Electricity Sector

    Gazprom Seeks Expansion Into Germany’s Electricity Sector

    On July 14, Gazprom CEO Aleksei Miller and RWE president Juergen Grossmann signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) that would, if implemented, open a new stage of Gazprom’s expansion into Germany and Europe (Interfax, DPA, Gazprom and RWE press releases, July 14).

    Flood and Drought from The Nuclear Green Revolution by Charles Barton

    Flood and Drought

    from The Nuclear Green Revolution

    TEPCO, Japanese Gov't: "Reactors Stabilized" from atomic power review by Will Davis

    TEPCO, Japanese Gov't: "Reactors Stabilized"

    “Global Warming” Part II: Toward a New Moral Equivalent of War by Alton C. Thompson / July 15th, 2011

    “Global Warming”

    Part II: Toward a New Moral Equivalent of War

    Latest News from AP: Locals want oldest US nuclear plant to stay open

    Latest News from AP: Locals want oldest US nuclear plant to stay open

    Yes, you read that correctly– the local community around Oyster Creek generating station has come out in support of the plant in their New Jersey community during a recent public hearing.

    Japan Has 17,580 Megawatts of Nuclear Capacity Online: Table

    Japan Has 17,580 Megawatts of Nuclear Capacity Online: Table

    Radiation Food Testing at EMSL Analytical, Inc. Source: EMSL Analytical, Inc.

    Radiation Food Testing at EMSL Analytical, Inc.

    Fear of Nuclear Power Plant Accidents Have Americans Concerned

    Fear of Nuclear Power Plant Accidents Have Americans Concerned

    Fukushima and Cultural Superiority

    Energy and peace: the dangers of our slow energy transition by Shruti Mehrotra and Benedick Bowie

    Energy and peace: the dangers of our slow energy transition

    by Shruti Mehrotra and Benedick Bowie

    Why America needs to move beyond coal: Five economic indicators by Stephen Lacey

    Why America needs to move beyond coal: Five economic indicators

    by Stephen Lacey

    Lighting the Hopes of the Grid-less By FELICITY BARRINGER


    Lighting the Hopes of the Grid-less

    The end of cheap coal by Richard Heinberg and David Fridley

    The end of cheap coal

    by Richard Heinberg and David Fridley

    Pay more for fuel or face blackouts, warns Chris Huhne

    Pay more for fuel or face blackouts, warns Chris Huhne

    Britain must get used to price rises on fuel bills or face blackouts, Chris Huhne, the Energy and Climate Change Secretary, warned yesterday.

    Administration Grossly Underestimated Carbon Cost, Says Study

    Administration Grossly Underestimated Carbon Cost, Says Study

    NRC’s Jaczko leads an agency in flux

    NRC’s Jaczko leads an agency in flux

    Reactor Developers Needing Less Aid Gain U.S. Edge, Lyons Says

    Reactor Developers Needing Less Aid Gain U.S. Edge, Lyons Says

    Tyrus W. Cobb: Yucca: The closer you are, the better you like it

    Tyrus W. Cobb: Yucca: The closer you are, the better you like it

    Nuke retreat If not at Yucca, where?

    atomic power review Nuclear in Japan / USA / Around the world: July 15

    atomic power review

    Nuclear in Japan / USA / Around the world: July 15

    Lithuania chooses Hitachi-GE for nuclear project

    Lithuania chooses Hitachi-GE for nuclear project

    Japan may scrap fast-breeder reactor -Kyodo

    Japan may scrap fast-breeder reactor -Kyodo

    House increases money for nuclear waste review

    House increases money for nuclear waste review

    US weighs nuclear subsidies amid budget crunch

    US weighs nuclear subsidies amid budget crunch

    Westinghouse to meet UK deadline on nuclear queries

    Westinghouse to meet UK deadline on nuclear queries

    Duke CEO looks into energy future

    Duke CEO looks into energy future

    Alexander Says Small Nuclear Reactors "May Well Be The Smartest, Safest Next Step�

    Alexander Says Small Nuclear Reactors "May Well Be The Smartest, Safest Next Step�

    Nuclear Expert Dispels Myths about Small Modular Nuclear Reactors in Senate Testimony

    Nuclear Expert Dispels Myths about Small Modular Nuclear Reactors in Senate Testimony

    TESTIMONY-BY: WILLIAM D. MAGWOOD, IV, COMMISSIONERAFFILIATION: NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION on SMRs


    ECONOMICS AND SAFETY OF MODULAR REACTORS;
    COMMITTEE: SENATE APPROPRIATIONS;
    SUBCOMMITTEE: ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT

    TESTIMONY-BY: WILLIAM D. MAGWOOD, IV, COMMISSIONERAFFILIATION: NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Statement of William D. Magwood, IV Commissioner Nuclear Regulatory CommissionCommittee on Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water DevelopmentJuly 14, 2011Chairman Feinstein, Ranking Member Alexander, and Mem

    Officials to discuss Neb. nuclear plant's recovery

    Officials to discuss Neb. nuclear plant's recovery

    BLAIR, Neb. (AP) — Officials are starting to think about what it will take to clean up the flood damage around Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant and get it running again once the Missouri River recedes.
    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has scheduled a July 27 meeting with Omaha Public Power District officials to talk about Fort Calhoun's recovery.

     

    NPPD, DOE reach settlement on costs for on-site storage

    NPPD, DOE reach settlement on costs for on-site storage

    Feds back up N.Y. AG's view on nuclear plant BY BRYAN COHEN

    Feds back up N.Y. AG's view on nuclear plant

    Feds require more safety analysis at Indian Point

    Feds require more safety analysis at Indian Point

    If Indian Point Nuclear Closes, Natural Gas Suppliers Profit

    If Indian Point Nuclear Closes, Natural Gas Suppliers Profit

    Will California meet its 2020 Renewables Goal?

     
     

    Phase-Out Hurdle Germany Could Restart Nuclear Plant to Plug Energy Gap

    Phase-Out Hurdle

    Germany Could Restart Nuclear Plant to Plug Energy Gap

    Hearing Report - Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development - "Light Water Small Modular Reactors"








    Witness Testimony of Christofer M. Mowry, President, Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Energy

    Statement by Dr. Moniz was not available

    Senate Appropriations Energy and Water Development Subcommittee Hearing Report
    July 14, 2011 – An Examination of the Safety and Economics of Small Light Water Modular Reactors

    Members Attending:
    Chair, Diane Feinstein (CA), Ranking Member Lamar Alexander (TN), Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC);

    Witnesses Panel 1:
    The Honorable Peter B. Lyons, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy US DOE
    The Honorable William D. Magwood, IV, Commissioner NRC

    Witnesses Panel 2:
    Dr. Edwin Lyman, Senior Scientist, Global Security, Union of Concerned Scientists
    Mr. Jim Ferland, President, Americas Region, Westinghouse Electric Company
    Christopher Mowry, President, Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Energy, Inc.
    Dr. Paul G. Lorenzini, CEO, NuScale Power
    Dr. Ernest J. Moniz, Professor of Physics, MIT

    Chairman Feinstein opened by questioning whether the DOE small reactor licensing support program proposed for FY 2012 should be pursued as a major investment of tax-payer funds to support two private firms’ designs and application process. She said the DOE program with an estimated federal cost share of $452 million would cost instead $1.5 billion with the public eventually paying $750 million. She said she thought electricity prices from SMRs would cost 10-40% more.

    She expressed concern about multiple reactors at one site, citing Fukushima, and events where incidents at one reactor might inhibit response at other reactors.  Feinstein also highlighted the potential dangers of storing spent fuel on-site. She criticized the lack of a national policy and said that the federal government’s obligation to store fuel would open it to liability in the event of further nuclear construction.  She said, “I don’t know how the NRC can say that it’s a fine way to keep stacking up these rods…we have no permanent storage and yet we’re looking at a new start.”  Ranking Member Alexander also asked NRC Commissioner Magwood about long term storage at nuclear plant sites.  Magwood said on-site storage is safe up to 60 years after decommissioning.

    Alexander expressed his support for the DOE program, saying that we need to move forward to achieve deployment by 2020. Alexander said sixty countries are considering introducing nuclear power, and they need our safety standards.  He said he hoped that nuclear might replace retiring coal plants. He noted that the relatively small volume of used fuel gave him confidence in our ability to deal with it. He also quoted Secretary Chu’s claim that the fuel would be safe in place for 100 years.

    Senator Feinstein asked if nuclear energy was receiving too much support.  She cited the 1.8 cent/kw-h production tax credit for nuclear plants.   Senator Alexander later addressed these concerns, saying that the production tax credit did not apply to existing plants and that SMRs would come online too late to qualify. [NOTE:  under current rule the production tax credit will expire before small reactors will receive a NRC license.] 

    Assistant Secretary Lyons answered questions about how SMRs are designed to be independently safe and that the NRC would consider the amount of reactors at each site when making its regulatory decisions. He also addressed her concerns on cost-sharing by encouraging a program that would give preference to companies that were willing to pay a higher share of the program’s costs, and that the 50/50 model should only be a baseline. He highlighted the success of NP 2010 and said that to compete internationally required the first-mover advantage that government support could create. He also said he couldn’t comment on the $1.5 billion number that Senator Feinstein cited without having gone through the procurement process. He also explained to her that a balanced approach was necessary, one that emphasized research on new generating technologies and waste management.

    Feinstein said she was uncomfortable starting a new nuclear reactor without having a process to deal with the used fuel.  Lyons said the Blue Ribbon Commission will address many of these issues.  Senator Graham said he was afraid the world would pass us by with regard to SMR technology if we waited too long.  Graham suggested that he work with the Chair on developing facilities at Savannah River to address used fuel issues.   Lyons agreed that a broader approach to used fuel would include reprocessing.

    Dr. Lyman said Fukushima has shown there are major problems with nuclear power.  New nuclear plants will need significantly increased safety standards and SMRs claims of safety are unpersuasive. No reactor, he said, can be passively designed for every situation.  He suggested that because these plants will need highly reliable active backup systems, there will be increased costs.  He suggested the industry was arguing to  reduce safety standards for SMRs.

    Mr. Ferland said the DOE NP 2010 cost-sharing program to jumpstart generation III reactors was a great success.  He argued that SMRs could improve US competitiveness.  He said asserted that the company is designing a plant the will address the loss of offsite power. Safety, he said, is top priority, and Westinghouse would never attempt to lower safety standards.

    Mr. Mowry, said the B&W SMR design will be safer by an order of two to three times that of current reactors.  He said the company would not invest in developing this new technology if they didn’t believe in long-term cost-effectiveness of small reactors.  He argued that to achieve 80% carbon free by 2050, there is a need for a viable nuclear program.

    Dr.  Lorenzini of NuScale said his company is a startup, not making any profits at this time, but still attempting to commercialize a SMR.  He said the design of the plant was cooled entirely by natural circulation.  The design will assist with on site storage of used fuel with 4 times the amount of water in the spent fuel pool, low density fuel racks, and underground storage.

    Dr. Moniz said he believes the nation cannot address reducing greenhouse gas emissions without nuclear energy.   However, there are barriers to private sector assuming full risk for the investment such as there is no price signal for carbon, no end to end testing of streamlined licensing, and regulatory uncertainties following Fukushima. These market imperfections create a need for public support.   He asserted that natural gas is only a bridge fuel to a future carbon-free energy sector. 

    Feinstein suggested that the economics of small reactors would not be competitive.  The industry witnesses all said that their investors and customers have come to a different conclusion.   Lyman said he could not believe industry because of the costs invested in the balance of plant (grid, security, operations, etc.).  Moniz said it depended on where the plant was built.  If, he said, you are replacing coal generation, the balance of plant issues are already addressed by the utility. 

    Feinstein suggested that these companies would need to have subsidies for operations.  All the companies said they would support a DOE program to jumpstart the technology, but they would not need federal funds for operations.  Moniz said he supports federal funding for design and engineering for nuclear projects but added he would like to see more federal investment in alternative technologies.  He said the program he now worries about most is carbon capture and sequestration.   He also said federal funding for energy storage technologies are critical for intermittent power such as wind and solar.  

    NRC's Japan Task Force Recommends Changes to Defense in Depth At Nuclear Plants

    NRC's Japan Task Force  Recommends Changes to Defense in Depth At Nuclear Plants; Cites Station Blackouts, Seismic, Flooding, and Spent Fuel Pools as Areas for Improvement

    Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation

    Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation

    IAEA Safety Standards SSR-2/2 (the revision of NS-R-2)
    Available for download: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1513_web.pdf

    Shell to Take Centre Stage at World Ethanol and Biofuels Conference

    Shell to Take Centre Stage at World Ethanol and Biofuels Conference
    LONDON, July 14, 2011/PRNewswire/ --

    F.O. Licht - the leading soft commodities analyst - has unveiled a raft of well-known and highly respected speakers for its 2011 World Ethanol and Biofuels conference, being held from 7th-10th November in Barcelona.

    Mark Gainsborough, Executive VP Strategy, Portfolio and Alternative Energy at Shell, will be giving the keynote speech and interview at the event, sharing - first-hand - Shell's strategy in conventional and advanced biofuels.

    Shell and leading Brazilian sugarcane company, Cosan, recently created Raizen, a $12 billion downstream joint venture for the production of ethanol, sugar and power, and the supply, distribution and retail of transportation fuels in Brazil. This marks Shell's first move into the production of today's biofuels and, with annual production capacity of about 2 billion litres per annum, the JV will be one of the world's largest ethanol producers with significant growth aspirations.

    "World Ethanol and Biofuels 2011 has the best line-up of speakers we've ever had," says Christoph Berg, Managing Director of F.O. Licht. "Mark Gainsborough's keynote interview will give attendees an unrivalled opportunity to hear from Shell. It will be particularly interesting to hear about the company's recently completed biggest-ever investment into biofuels by an oil major, underscoring the role of biofuels in reducing CO2 emissions and diversifying the transport fuels sector."

    In addition, at F.O. Licht's World Ethanol and Biofuels 2011, attendees will see more than 55 speakers address a global audience of more than 650 of the industry's most influential people. Olivier Mace, Head of Global Strategy and External Affairs for BP Biofuels; Per Salomonsson, Coordinator Alternative Fuels at Volvo; Richard Mills, Strategy Director for UK and Ireland at the Boeing Company; and Claus Sauter, CEO at Verbio are all on the conference's impressive speaker list, designed to cover all major aspects of this fast-moving industry.

    To find out more visit http://www.web.agraevents.com

    About World Ethanol and Biofuels

    F.O. Licht's World Ethanol and Biofuels is the only event that brings together leaders from across the ethanol supply chain from all over the world - international producers, oil majors, traders, banks and investors, biotechnology companies, technology providers, media and more - a highly influential audience is guaranteed.

    This year, the conference has broadened its scope to provide insights into all types of biofuels and will feature new faces and a new location ensuring that this event remains the most important networking event in your diary.

    The conference will take place from 7th-10th November 2011 at the W Hotel in Barcelona, Spain. More than 650 people in the global ethanol industry will be there, joining speakers from Shell, BP, Virgin Atlantic Airways, Solazyme, The RFA, Abengoa Bioenergy Trading Europe, The Boeing Company and Verbio.

    About F.O. Licht

    F.O. Licht is the leading soft commodity analyst, reporting on a wide range of commodities, including sugar, ethanol and biofuels grain, coffee, tea and molasses, , with reports online and in print. With over 130 years' experience, F.O. Licht offers unrivalled and timely information across an extensive portfolio of publications and services.

    Source: F.O. Licht
    Contact: Michael Grech, Tel: +44-20-701-77551, Email: michael.grech@informa.com . TO REQUEST A FREE PRESSPASS TO F.O. LICHT'S WORLD ETHANOL AND BIOFUELS CONFERENCE PLEASE EMAIL JESSICA GOZZETT - jessica.gozzett@informa.com

    Ohio Poised as Global Leader in Solar Industry

    Ohio Poised as Global Leader in Solar Industry

    State's business-friendly climate and industry expertise provides ideal location for solar companies

    PR Newswire
    COLUMBUS, Ohio, July 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Business owners striving to launch and grow in the solar industry are easily drawn to locations that boast their desire and willingness to nurture invention. However, in order to successfully grow a business in a developing industry like the solar industry, businesses require more than a promise of funding. They need a perfect location where innovation is backed by generations of hands-on manufacturing expertise combined with extensive resources that also support profitable commercial success. Resources such as R&D, academic institutions, a skilled workforce, strong industry partnerships and a supply chain efficiently and cost-effectively bring a product to market.
    (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20071107/CLW113LOGO )
    Ohio has built its world-class manufacturing base in glass and plastic films to support the automotive industry. This existing infrastructure is now being repurposed to create truly innovative materials and products for solar photovoltaic technologies. This is key to new solar power technology development and the rapidly growing commercial success of Ohio's advanced energy community. In support, the state's academic institutions are solving some of the industry's most challenging innovation needs and preparing the next generation of advanced energy engineers for business success.
    "Ohio is becoming a national and international leader in the solar industry," said Rick Stansley, co-director of the Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, a world-class science and technology platform dedicated to research, development and commercialization of new photovoltaic solutions.
    "The state's long history as a manufacturing leader shows that we have the workforce and expertise to succeed in the evolving manufacturing sector and provide a world-class supply chain for the solar industry," continued Stansley.
    Finding the perfect location that successfully balances world-class industry resources, academic institutions and skilled labor with market access is critical for success in the solar industry.
    Ohio offers a complete advanced energy supply chain infrastructure for businesses in the solar energy industry. The state's manufacturing strengths, skilled workforce and central location make Ohio a preferred location for advanced energy manufacturing businesses.
    Northwest Ohio's historic strengths in the glass industry along with the world-class supply chain of manufacturers and systems integrators found throughout the state are a driving force supporting the state's solar industry growth. Leading solar manufacturing companies, such as First Solar Inc., WK Solar Group LLC and Xunlight Corporation, have operations in Ohio.
    Last week, Isofoton, a leading solar energy technology company, chose Napoleon, Ohio as the new home for its North American manufacturing facility. Angel Luis Serrano, CEO of Isofoton said, "Our intention is to advance to all corners of the North American marketplace from our Ohio base, including advanced research and development."
    Isofoton has worked with many Ohio partners to produce an "all-Ohio" supply chain. After extensive research, Ohio was determined the best location choice because it is a top five electricity generator and consumer, a top 10 in population, top five in strength of state solar carve-out, as well as home to several top-5 utilities and has a strong solar energy cluster.
    American Municipal Power, Inc. (AMP) has agreed to purchase up to 200 MW of "made in Ohio" solar panels over five years from Isofoton's Napoleon factory, which also has been selected by the Turning Point Solar project and American Electric Power (AEP) to supply Napoleon, Ohio-produced photovoltaic panels for 49.9 MW of solar energy to be erected on reclaimed mine lands in rural Appalachia. Isofoton is also working closely with the Toledo Port Authority on "made in Ohio" PV panels for solar energy projects.
    "The state's long-standing heritage of developing manufacturing facilities and associated jobs shows companies like Isofoton that Ohio is the place where emerging technologies can thrive," said Joseph Hamrock, president of AEP Ohio. "At AEP Ohio, we are proud to play an instrumental role in bringing new jobs to Ohio, while advancing renewable energy technologies in the Midwest."
    Ohio's universities and colleges are ready to meet the need for new technologies and skilled advanced energy workers through new research, degrees and training specific to the advanced energy industry through programs such as The University Clean Energy Alliance of Ohio (UCEAO) and investments through Ohio Third Frontier.
    Converting research into commercial success is another key to Ohio's success. Programs such as the state's Edison Technology Centers and Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization initiative (PVIC), a collaboration between The University of Toledo, The Ohio State University (OSU) and Bowling Green State University, have been instrumental in advancing solar technology innovation.
    In addition, companies that locate in Ohio can reduce operating costs with the state's favorable business climate, because there is no tax on inventory or corporate income - and boost the return on investment with no tax on purchases of machinery and equipment. A recent report by the Quantitative Economics and Statistics Practices (QUEST) of Ernst & Young in conjunction with the Council On State Taxation (COST) ranks Ohio as third in the nation for friendliest tax environment.
    Companies continue to discover the benefits of investing in Ohio, finding a preferred location for capital investment, a competitive business environment and a perfect balance between business pursuits and personal aspirations.
    "Ohio's success is not solely dependent on the strength of its business advantages. It's about Ohio's promise of work-life balance," said Ed Burghard, executive director of the Ohio Business Development Coalition, the nonprofit organization that markets the state for capital investment. "Low-cost, low-stress communities and short commutes create the State of Perfect Balance, where you can achieve both professional and personal success without sacrificing one for the other."
    About the Ohio Business Development Coalition
    The Ohio Business Development Coalition is a nonprofit organization that provides marketing strategy and implementation to support Ohio's economic development efforts. For more information, visit www.ohiomeansbusiness.com.
    SOURCE Ohio Business Development Coalition
    CONTACT: Dace de la Foret, Paul Werth Associates, +1-614-224-8114, ext. 235, delaforet@paulwerth.com
    Web Site: http://www.ohiomeansbusiness.com

    World Donors Agree to Fund New Chornobyl Shelter

    World Donors Agree to Fund New Chornobyl Shelter
    KYIV, Ukraine, July 14, 2011/PRNewswire/ --

    The Nuclear Safety Account and the Chornobyl Shelter Fund donors agreed to provide the necessary financial resources for the implementation of the Chornobyl projects. The decision was made at the Assembly of Contributors to the Chornobyl Shelter Fund meeting on July 7, 2011, in London. The new construction will help neutralize any possible future threats to the environment from the Chornobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine.

    While reporting about the results of the donors meeting to the President of Ukraine Viktor Yanukovych, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine Kostyantyn Gryshchenko stated that the issue of raising funds for the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) is finally resolved.

    The needed amount of financial resources for SIP funding is EUR 740 mln. On the 25th anniversary of the Chornobyl tragedy on April 26, 2011, a fundraiser was held resulting in donors' obligations of EUR 550 mln.

    The new decision of the world donors allows for the immediate start of the SIP execution and its completion by 2015. The SIP involves stabilization of the existing sarcophagus and the construction of a New Safe Confinement (NSC) for the damaged nuclear reactor.

    Earlier, the Director of the Nuclear Safety Department of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) Vincent Novak said that, in order to meet the schedule for the NSC construction, it is important to begin metal constructions assembly by autumn for them to be ready for installation on the site by next spring.

    In 1988 local scientists announced that the life time of the sarcophagus was 20 to 30 years. The Chornobyl Shelter Fund (CSF) was established nearly a decade later in December of 1997 to collect funds for the NSC project. Currently, the European Union, the United States, and Ukraine cooperate to help meet the CSF's objective while the EBRD is entrusted to manage the CSF and provide oversight of the funds disbursement.

    The construction of the original Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant sarcophagus began on May 20, 1986 - three weeks after the accident, and lasted for 206 days. Over 400 thousand m3 of concrete and 7300 tons of metal framework were used to lock in 16 tons of uranium and plutonium, 200 tons of radioactive corium, and 30 tons of contaminated dust.

    Source: Worldwide News Ukraine
    For more information, contact Maria Ivanova +380443324784 news@wnu-ukraine.com, Project Manager at Worldwide News Ukraine

    Radiation and Smoke Detectors Moderator | July 15, 2011

     

    Radiation and Smoke Detectors
     

    Moderator
     
    | July 15, 2011 at 9:24 am | Tags: nuclear
     
    | Categories: Nuclear Materials
     
    | URL: http://wp.me/p1fSSY-nw
     
    In the late 1930s, a smoker inadvertently made a discovery for detecting smoke. The Swiss physicist Walter Jaeger tried to invent a sensor for poison gas. His device failed: small concentrations of gas had no effect on the sensor's conductivity. Frustrated, Jaeger lit a cigarette—and noticed that a meter on the instrument registered a drop in the current. Smoke particles had apparently done what poison gas could not. Jaeger's experiment was one of the advances that paved the way for the modern smoke detector.
    Here's something else surprising: Smoke detectors work because of radiation. They are an example of the beneficial uses of radiation and radioactive materials.
    The first significant installations of commercial smoke detectors started in the US around 1969. Since then, the installation of smoke detectors has saved thousands of lives, numerous injuries, and millions of dollars. It has been reported that smoke detectors are installed in 93 percent of US residences. However, it is estimated that more than 30 percent of these alarms don’t work, as users remove the batteries or forget to replace them in a timely manner.
    In the US, while smoke detector manufacturers and distributors are subject to NRC regulation, end users of smoke detectors (consumers) are typically not because of the small amount of radioactive material used in each detector.
    The most common type of smoke detector consists of an ionization chamber, electronic circuitry, a power source that is usually a battery, an alarm mechanism, and an outer case. The ionization chamber is the main component. It consists of a source of ionizing radiation, usually Americium (Am-241) positioned between two oppositely-charged electrodes. The radiation source is a very small metallic foil disc about 3 to 5 millimeters in diameter.
    To give you an idea of the small amount of radiation that is emitted by this disc, a person flying coast-to-coast gets more radiation from cosmic sources in one trip than a person sitting in the close proximity of an ionization smoke detector gets in a whole year.
    Here is how the device works: Particles emitted during radioactive decay of the Am-241 interact with neutral air molecules flowing through the chamber and convert them to positive ions by removal of electrons. The removed electrons then form negative ions by attachment to other neutral molecules. The resulting positive and negative ions are attracted toward the electrodes, causing a small, reasonably steady current between the electrodes. The electronic circuitry monitors this current and, if the current drops below a preset level, which it will if the air entering the chamber contains enough smoke, it triggers an audible alarm.
    If you are interested in the technical evaluations the NRC has done on smoke detectors and other consumer products containing radioactive material please see NUREG-1717 “Systematic Radiological Assessment of Exemptions for Source and Byproduct Materials”
     
     .
    Ujagar Bhachu
    Mechanical Engineer

    Letter From Department of Interior on Potential Impact of Victoria Nuclear Plant on Whooping Cranes Comes to Light

    Letter From Department of Interior on Potential Impact of Victoria Nuclear Plant on Whooping Cranes Comes to Light

    Exelon "Inadvertently Omitted" to File October 2008 Letter Until June 2011

    AEP Places Carbon Capture Commercialization on Hold, Citing Uncertain Status of Climate Policy, Weak Economy

    Jul 14, 2011 08:58 ET
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    AEP Places Carbon Capture Commercialization on Hold, Citing Uncertain Status of Climate Policy, Weak Economy

    PR Newswire
    COLUMBUS, Ohio, July 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- American Electric Power (NYSE: AEP) is terminating its cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy and placing its plans to advance carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technology to commercial scale on hold, citing the current uncertain status of U.S. climate policy and the continued weak economy as contributors to the decision.
    "We are placing the project on hold until economic and policy conditions create a viable path forward," said Michael G. Morris, AEP chairman and chief executive officer. "With the help of Alstom, the Department of Energy and other partners, we have advanced CCS technology more than any other power generator with our successful two-year project to validate the technology. But at this time it doesn't make economic sense to continue work on the commercial-scale CCS project beyond the current engineering phase.
    "We are clearly in a classic 'which comes first?' situation," Morris said. "The commercialization of this technology is vital if owners of coal-fueled generation are to comply with potential future climate regulations without prematurely retiring efficient, cost-effective generating capacity. But as a regulated utility, it is impossible to gain regulatory approval to recover our share of the costs for validating and deploying the technology without federal requirements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions already in place. The uncertainty also makes it difficult to attract partners to help fund the industry's share."
    In 2009, AEP was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) to receive funding of up to $334 million through the Clean Coal Power Initiative to pay part of the costs for installation of a commercial-scale CCS system at AEP's Mountaineer coal-fueled power plant in New Haven, W.Va. The system would capture at least 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) from 235 megawatts of the plant's 1,300 megawatts of capacity. The captured CO2, approximately 1.5 million metric tons per year, would be treated and compressed, then injected into suitable geologic formations for permanent storage approximately 1.5 miles below the surface.
    Plans were for the project to be completed in four phases, with the system to begin commercial operation in 2015. AEP has informed the DOE that it will complete the first phase of the project (front-end engineering and design, development of an environmental impact statement and development of a detailed Phase II and Phase III schedule) but will not move to the second phase.
    DOE's share of the cost for completion of the first phase is expected to be approximately $16 million, half the expenses that qualify under the DOE agreement.
    AEP and partner Alstom began operating a smaller-scale validation of the technology in October 2009 at the Mountaineer Plant, the first fully-integrated capture and storage facility in the world. That system captured up to 90 percent of the CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas equivalent to 20 megawatts of generating capacity and injected it into suitable geologic formations for permanent storage approximately 1.5 miles below the surface. The validation project, which received no federal funds, was closed as planned in May after meeting project goals. Between October 2009 and May 2011, the life of the validation project, the CCS system operated more than 6,500 hours, captured more than 50,000 metric tons of CO2 and permanently stored more than 37,000 metric tons of CO2.
    "The lessons we learned from the validation project were incorporated into the Phase I engineering for the commercial-scale project," Morris said.
    American Electric Power is one of the largest electric utilities in the United States, delivering electricity to more than 5 million customers in 11 states. AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S. AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765-kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined. AEP's transmission system directly or indirectly serves about 10 percent of the electricity demand in the Eastern Interconnection, the interconnected transmission system that covers 38 eastern and central U.S. states and eastern Canada, and approximately 11 percent of the electricity demand in ERCOT, the transmission system that covers much of Texas. AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia and West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service Company of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas). AEP's headquarters are in Columbus, Ohio.
    This report made by American Electric Power and its Registrant Subsidiaries contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Although AEP and each of its Registrant Subsidiaries believe that their expectations are based on reasonable assumptions, any such statements may be influenced by factors that could cause actual outcomes and results to be materially different from those projected. Among the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements are: the economic climate and growth in, or contraction within, AEP's service territory and changes in market demand and demographic patterns; inflationary or deflationary interest rate trends; volatility in the financial markets, particularly developments affecting the availability of capital on reasonable terms and developments impairing AEP's ability to finance new capital projects and refinance existing debt at attractive rates; the availability and cost of funds to finance working capital and capital needs, particularly during periods when the time lag between incurring costs and recovery is long and the costs are material; electric load and customer growth; weather conditions, including storms, and AEP's ability to recover significant storm restoration costs through applicable rate mechanisms; available sources and costs of, and transportation for, fuels and the creditworthiness and performance of fuel suppliers and transporters; availability of necessary generating capacity and the performance of AEP's generating plants; AEP's ability to recover Indiana Michigan Power's Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant Unit 1 restoration costs through warranty, insurance and the regulatory process; AEP's ability to recover regulatory assets and stranded costs in connection with deregulation; AEP's ability to recover increases in fuel and other energy costs through regulated or competitive electric rates; AEP's ability to build or acquire generating capacity, including the Turk Plant, and transmission line facilities (including the ability to obtain any necessary regulatory approvals and permits) when needed at acceptable prices and terms and to recover those costs (including the costs of projects that are cancelled) through applicable rate cases or competitive rates; new legislation, litigation and government regulation, including requirements for reduced emissions of sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, carbon, soot or particulate matter and other substances or additional regulation of fly ash and similar combustion products that could impact the continued operation and cost recovery of AEP's plants; timing and resolution of pending and future rate cases, negotiations and other regulatory decisions (including rate or other recovery of new investments in generation, distribution and transmission service and environmental compliance); resolution of litigation (including AEP's dispute with Bank of America); AEP's ability to constrain operation and maintenance costs; AEP's ability to develop and execute a strategy based on a view regarding prices of electricity, natural gas and other energy-related commodities; changes in the creditworthiness of the counterparties with whom AEP has contractual arrangements, including participants in the energy trading market; actions of rating agencies, including changes in the ratings of debt; volatility and changes in markets for electricity, natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel and other energy-related commodities; changes in utility regulation, including the implementation of electric security plans and related regulation in Ohio and the allocation of costs within regional transmission organizations, including PJM and SPP; accounting pronouncements periodically issued by accounting standard-setting bodies; the impact of volatility in the capital markets on the value of the investments held by AEP's pension, other postretirement benefit plans and nuclear decommissioning trust and the impact on future funding requirements; prices and demand for power that AEP generates and sells at wholesale; changes in technology, particularly with respect to new, developing or alternative sources of generation; and other risks and unforeseen events, including wars, the effects of terrorism (including increased security costs), embargoes and other catastrophic events.
    SOURCE American Electric Power
    CONTACT: MEDIA: Pat D. Hemlepp, Director, Corporate Media Relations, +1-614-716-1620; ANALYSTS: Julie Sherwood, Director, Investor Relations, +1-614-716-2663

    Fighting for nuclear energy

    Fighting for nuclear energy


    From my point of view, neither the industry nor the government bodies are doing enough to share accurate information about nuclear energy. If they were doing their job and telling the real story about the technology, their efforts would inevitably provide a far more hopeful picture about nuclear energy and its demonstrated potential for making the world a richer and cleaner place – especially compared to continuing addiction to competitive fossil fuels.

    UN briefed on Syria's alleged nuclear activities

    UN briefed on Syria's alleged nuclear activities
     

    United Nations (AFP) July 14, 2011 - The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reported to UN Security Council members on Syria's suspected nuclear activities Thursday during a closed-door meeting. "Council members were briefed by the IAEA, who provided the technical details that led to its conclusion of the violation by Syria of its nuclear non-proliferation obligations," said a French source. On June 9, the IAEA decid ... more

    NRC Near Term Report on Fukushima Safety Issues

    NRC Near Term Report on Fukushima Safety Issues

    Marine Power Will Be Cost Competitive in 14 Years

    Marine Power Will Be Cost Competitive in 14 Years

    Tepco injects nitrogen into No. 3 reactor

    Tepco injects nitrogen into No. 3 reactor

    Fukushima plant on target for January cold shutdown

    Kyodo

    Energy and peace: the dangers of our slow energy transition

    Energy and peace: the dangers of our slow energy transition

    Financial Times - Energy Source 7/15


    Energy Source
     

    Conoco’s Mulva reverses rush to grow
     
    Jim Mulva, chief executive of ConocoPhillips, has been in a hurry to establish his legacy. In the beginning, it was going to be as the head of one of the world's biggest international oil and gas companies. And he got there, boosting Conoco into 5th place, in terms of production. But then the economic downturn hit, and the weaknesses in his grow-through-acquisition strategy were exposed. Conoco was forced to slash capital spending, lay off staff and sell billions of dollars in assets.
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/IIYQ5A/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15
     
     
    Energy headlines: UK reforms create two-tier winners
     
    UK energy reform to generate two-tier victors - FT BP redevelops two N Sea oilfields - FT IEA to decide on further oil stock drawdown - FT Electricity market reforms could force companies to leave UK - Telegraph
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/TUPLSY/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15
     
     
    Unconventional moves depend on safety record
     
    Several years ago, analysts covering the oil industry were raising alarm bells about how the majors would be making money in the decades to come. With conventional oilfields maturing and no sign of the shale gas revolution at that point, there was pressure from shareholders for the majors to get into renewables. The majors responded by delving into projects to extract biofuels from chicken fat and soybeans. But that phase is over.
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/C45XVH/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15
     
     
    FT podcast: Energy Weekly
     
    UK electricity reform, Australian carbon pricing, Macarthur Coal In this week’s podcast: We talk to former speaker of the California state assembly and founder of G24 Innovations, Bob Hertzberg, about the UK’s white paper on reforming the electricity market; we look at Australian prime minister, Julia Gillard’s announcement on carbon pricing; and, we discuss the possible takeover of mining company Macarthur Coal by US-based Peabody Energy. Presented by David Blair with Pilita Clark and William MacNamara. Produced by LJ Filotrani
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/ORJNY5/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15
     
     
    Smelly feet deployed in fight against malaria
     
    A device that uses the odour of smelly feet to trap mosquitoes is to get a boost in funding in the fight against malaria. Scientists have known for some time that human odour attracts mosquitoes, but researchers from Tanzania’s Ifakara Health Institute have found that the smell of human feet can attract four times as many mosquitoes as ordinary human scent. The anti-malarial foot odour trap will receive a grant of $775,000, co-funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the non-for-profit organisation, Grand Challenges Canada. The device works by using a synthetic odour of human feet as bait …
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/DW4K2G/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15
     
     
    Markets face risk of carbon bubble
     
    After the dot.com crash and the credit crunch, investors are being warned of the potential consequences of a ‘carbon bubble’. Stock markets are sitting on vast reserves of fossil fuels that cannot be burnt if the world is to stick to climate change targets, according to research issued by the Carbon Tracker initiative. The report claims that only 20 per cent of listed carbon reserves can be used if the target of a 2 degrees Celsius rise in global temperatures is to be achieved by 2050. The 2 degree limit is based on the growing scientific consensus on limiting the …
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/MS9RK2/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15
     
     
    Energy headlines: why the UK needs electricity market reform
     
    Why Britain needs energy reform - Telegraph Bold target set for offshore wind but sceptics see hidden nuclear subsidy - Guardian Chesapeake to put $1bn toward gas use - FT Nuclear Power Supply Declines in Japan - WSJ
    http://link.ft.com/r/UXDMSS/ZGGDMN/GKXE28/XTPKGH/97Z5OP/CM/h?a1=2011&a2=7&a3=15