Michele Kearney's Nuclear Wire

Major News and Commentary Military and Civilian Nuclear Activities

Saturday, October 15, 2011

NISA secretly calculated Fukushima meltdown risks / Agency considered worst-case scenario of 'China syndrome' The Yomiuri Shimbun

NISA secretly calculated Fukushima meltdown risks / Agency considered worst-case scenario of 'China syndrome'

And the Band Played On

And the Band Played On

Report reveals Japan feared aftershocks would cause fuel melt at crippled nuke plant

Report reveals Japan feared aftershocks would cause fuel melt at crippled nuke plant

UW-Madison nuclear expert sees implications for US in Fukushima disaster

UW-Madison nuclear expert sees implications for US in Fukushima disaster

Nuclear power has to be part of future energy plan (editorial)

Nuclear power has to be part of future energy plan (editorial)

Paper shows Japan feared aftershocks at nuke plant

Paper shows Japan feared aftershocks at nuke plant

China's nuclear energy program continues in spite of Fukushima

Chinas nuclear program continues and even the completion of nuclear
plants already under construction will
increase China's nuclear power to about 45GWe.
http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/10/chinas-nuclear-energy-program-continues.html
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Flibe Energy Liquid Flouride Thorium Reactor Company

Summary of the Inroduction to Flibe energy presentation. Flibe energy is working
towards liquid flouride thorium reactor. Flibe Energy will initially
design, develop and demonstrate a small modular liquid-fluoride
thorium reactor (SM-LFTR) for the US military.
* Desired first demonstration at a military site to be determined.
* Design power level of 20-50 MWe.

http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/10/flibe-energy-liquid-flouride-thorium.html
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We won't clean up N-plant waste; ENERGY SECRETARY'S BLUNT MESSAGE TO FIRMS OVER NEW BIDS

We won't clean up N-plant waste; ENERGY SECRETARY'S BLUNT MESSAGE TO FIRMS OVER NEW BIDS

U.N. Agency to Issue Iranian Nukes Report: Sources

U.N. Agency to Issue Iranian Nukes Report: Sources

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Published: 14 Oct 2011 12:11
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VIENNA - The U.N. atomic watchdog will issue a new report next month detailing information it has on Iran's alleged efforts to create a nuclear weapon, sources here said Oct. 14.
The new assessment, due to go before the board of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on Nov. 17-18, "should be more complete," a diplomat to the Vienna-based watchdog told AFP on Oct. 14.

Don’t Count Oil Out Alternative energies won’t replace oil, gas, and coal anytime soon. By Robert Bryce

Don’t Count Oil Out

Alternative energies won’t replace oil, gas, and coal anytime soon.

By

5 Spotlight On Safety At Nuclear Power Plants: The View From Oyster Creek6 Richard Webster and Julia LaMense

5
Spotlight On Safety At Nuclear Power Plants: The View From Oyster Creek6
Richard Webster and Julia LaMense

Chu: In global market, ‘Invented in America’ not good enough

Chu: In global market, ‘Invented in America’ not good enough

Japan Contamination Maps: Radiation is Spreading.... by Lucas W Hixson

Japan Contamination Maps: Radiation is Spreading....

Friday, October 14, 2011

How safe is the Pilgrim Nuclear Station in Plymouth?

How safe is the Pilgrim Nuclear Station in Plymouth?

Did The Administration Break The The Law On Solyndra? Watch The Latest Hearing To Find Out from zero hedge by Tyler Durden

Did The Administration Break The The Law On Solyndra? Watch The Latest Hearing To Find Out

from zero hedge

Japan Detects More Nuclear Plant Cesium

Japan Detects More Nuclear Plant Cesium

Japan on Wednesday said it had found significant quantities of radioactive cesium at locations bordering the prefecture in which the Fukushima Daiichi atomic facility is based, the Asahi Shimbun reported (see GSN, Oct. 13).

IAEA Should Detail Iranian Nuclear Missile Worries: U.S.

atomic power review Fukushima Daiichi No. 1 enclosed

atomic power review

Fukushima Daiichi No. 1 enclosed

The enclosure for Fukushima Daiichi No. 1 is complete as of October 14, 2011. This was the first plant to suffer a hydrogen gas explosion with subsequent severe reactor building damage during the accident sequence.

Modular reactor firm acquired by parent company of Savannah River Site contractor

Modular reactor firm acquired by parent company of Savannah River Site contractor

NRC certification of GE Hitachi’s new reactor to be delayed

NRC certification of GE Hitachi’s new reactor to be delayed

CORRECTED - (OFFICIAL)-NRC to finish AP1000 work before GE reactor

CORRECTED - (OFFICIAL)-NRC to finish AP1000 work before GE reactor

95% disagree with “Beyond Nuclear”. Let’s make it 99%

95% disagree with “Beyond Nuclear”. Let’s make it 99%

Roger Johnson: Could OC be the next Fukushima?

Roger Johnson: Could OC be the next Fukushima?

TEPCO failed to report re-evaluation of quake resistance for equipment at Fukushima plant

TEPCO failed to report re-evaluation of quake resistance for equipment at Fukushima plant

SRS can lead way to clean energy

SRS can lead way to clean energy

Areva CEO: Cheap energy is America’s competitive edge

Areva CEO: Cheap energy is America’s competitive edge

NRC delays reactor certification to study Japan damage

NRC delays reactor certification to study Japan damage

NRC expects to act by year-end on Westinghouse AP1000

IAEA urges pragmatic clean-up

IAEA urges pragmatic clean-up
14 October 2011
An international expert mission has advised the Japanese government to avoid "over-conservatism" in its efforts to remediate large areas of contaminated land around the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

The 12-member team was assembled by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) at the request of the Japanese government to help them develop remediation strategies for land contaminated as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in March. The team reviewed remediation-related strategies, plans and works, including contamination mapping, currently undertaken by Japanese authorities.

The team returned from Japan today and has now published its preliminary findings and presented them to the Japanese government.
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Panetta Opposes "Any Reductions" to Nuclear Complex Modernization Budget -- Global Security Newswire

Panetta Opposes "Any Reductions" to Nuclear Complex Modernization Budget -- Global Security Newswire

Tokyo Hit With Fukushima Radiation from Washington's Blog

Tokyo Hit With Fukushima Radiation

from Washington's Blog

Are we on the Brink of an Energy Revolution? Andrea Rossi to Build 1MW Power Plant


Are we on the Brink of an Energy Revolution? Andrea Rossi to Build 1MW Power Plant

Failed energy projects cross U.S. party lines

Failed energy projects cross U.S. party lines

Obama wants a government bank to fund more Solyndras

Obama wants a government bank to fund more Solyndras

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Weekly Review from Nuclear Power Industry News by Nuclear Street News Team

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Weekly Review

Idaho Samizdat: Nuke Notes All is not quiet on the nuclear front

Idaho Samizdat: Nuke Notes

 

SACE: Department of Energy Continues To Stonewall FOIA Request Seeking Disclosure of Details in $8.33 Billion Federal Loan Guarantee for Proposed Risky Vogtle Nuclear Reactors PR Newswire ATLANTA, Oct. 13, 2011

SACE: Department of Energy Continues To Stonewall FOIA Request Seeking Disclosure of Details in $8.33 Billion Federal Loan Guarantee for Proposed Risky Vogtle Nuclear Reactors

PR Newswire
Is DOE Hiding Miniscule Credit Subsidy Fee of 1.5 Percent … Or Even Less …for New Vogtle Reactors?  Ignoring Need for Transparency After Collapse of Recent Loan Guarantee, DOE Continues to Refuse to Operate in an Open, Taxpayer-Friendly Way.

Exelon takes on EDF over Constellation bid

Exelon takes on EDF over Constellation bid

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Flibe Energy Liquid Flouride Thorium Reactor Company

Flibe Energy Liquid Flouride Thorium Reactor Company
Next Big Future
Flibe Energy will initially design, develop and demonstrate a small modular liquid-fluoride thorium reactor (SM-LFTR) for the US military.

GM Ditches the Gas Tank in Its New Electric Car

GM Ditches the Gas Tank in Its New Electric Car

It seems few consumers want range-extending gas engines in their electric vehicles.
General Motors plans to sell an electric version of the Spark, a mini-car that it currently sells outside the United States. GM will sell the gasoline version of the Spark in the U.S. starting next year, and will follow with the electric version in select U.S. markets and around the world in 2013. The electric Spark will be powered by batteries made by A123 Systems, based in Waltham, Massachusetts.

EPC contract signed for Tianwan Phase II

EPC contract signed for Tianwan Phase II

Tianwan (CNNC)The engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contract has been signed for the second phase of the Tianwan nuclear power plant by two China National Nuclear Corporation subsidiaries.

Nuclear Safety and the East Coast Earthquake

August 25, 2011

Nuclear Safety and the East Coast Earthquake

Huffington Post

As a native San Franciscan, I know firsthand the destructive power earthquakes can have on lives, property and critical infrastructure.
Luckily this week’s 5.8 magnitude earthquake, with an epicenter in Virginia, caused minimal damage and thankfully no loss of life.
The earthquake did cause two nuclear reactors at the North Anna Nuclear Power Plant in central Virginia to lose power, requiring the deployment of back-up diesel generators.
The incident was a stark reminder of how vulnerable America’s nuclear power plants are to natural disasters.
Uninterrupted electricity is essential for nuclear safety. Without electricity, nuclear power plants are unable to pump cooling water through reactor cores and spent fuel pools to prevent overheating and fuel melting.
Without power, plant operators cannot control reactor activity or remotely monitor spent fuel.
It was the loss of electrical power that led to the partial-meltdown of multiple reactors, significant radiation release and damage to the spent fuel pools at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan after the devastating 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in March.
Nuclear power provides 20 percent of our nation’s energy and 70 percent of the zero-carbon electricity in the United States.
Nuclear has a future in our country’s energy mix, but we must ensure that our domestic plants are designed to both endure the threats we can foresee and respond to scenarios we never imagined.
Shortly after the disaster in Japan, I visited California’s two nuclear power plants—San Onofre and Diablo Canyon—to review safety protocols. Both of these plants are similar to the North Anna plant in Virginia.
I have also reviewed reports issued by the Blue Ribbon Commission on Nuclear Waste and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Task Force on the disaster in Japan.
These expert reports, the recent East Coast earthquake and my own experiences provide the following lessons:
First, our country needs a comprehensive, national policy to address the management of spent fuel, the radioactive waste produced while generating electricity by fission.
The Nuclear Waste Policy Act required the federal government to begin storing nuclear waste on a long-term basis in 1998. In reality, radioactive spent fuel is today stored at reactor sites—at enormous taxpayer expense—because there is no current alternative to this system. The liability for this de facto permanent storage will cost taxpayers more than $15 billion through 2020.
In California, radioactive waste continues to await federal pickup at two sites, even though the reactors are decommissioned. At our two active reactors, spent fuel removed from reactors in 1984 is still cooling in wet spent fuel pools.
In Japan, there were no problems with the hardened dry casks that stored spent fuel without need for electricity. But there were major problems with spent fuel pools, which are very similar to fuel pools at U.S. reactors.
The tragedy in Japan proved that we desperately need to make on-site storage safer and find a way to remove stockpiled waste to safer, more secure regional sites.
Second, today’s efforts to protect against seismic and flooding hazards may not be sufficient.
Japan’s nuclear disaster earlier this year occurred because the earthquake and tsunami vastly exceeded the design parameters of the Daiichi reactors.
Virginia’s reactors were designed to endure a 6.2 quake—larger than what struck this week—so safety systems functioned as designed.
Unfortunately, many U.S. reactors were built decades ago when we knew less about flooding, seismicity and other threats. But the NRC does not consider new information on threats—including earthquakes—when it relicenses nuclear plants. The NRC’s own task force in July recommended that this policy be changed.
Third, we must improve the redundant safety systems to respond to disasters.
A prolonged blackout in Japan caused by the earthquake and tsunami degraded the ability to prevent and mitigate disaster.
In Virginia, no prolonged blackout occurred. Backup systems were required for less than 24 hours.
The NRC should work closely with plant operators to make sure nuclear power plants can safely cool fuel and monitor systems during a prolonged loss of electrical power.
Finally, for spent fuel stored at reactor sites, dry casks are safer and more secure than permanent storage in spent fuel pools.
A 2006 report by the National Academies of Science found that dry cask storage has inherent safety and security advantages over wet pool storage. Even with that knowledge, 50,000 metric tons of spent fuel is stored in pools throughout the country.
Thankfully, this week’s earthquake caused little damage and nuclear plant backup safety systems worked as designed.
But the earthquake--in an area of the country not known for the type of seismic activity that occurs on the Pacific Ocean’s “ring of fire”–is proof that Mother Nature can act whenever and wherever she wants.
If we are going to rely on nuclear power to generate energy, we must improve safety and establish a comprehensive, national policy to address the management of nuclear waste.
At present, we lack that national policy. The Virginia earthquake was thankfully not a Japan-style disaster. We need to learn the lessons we can to assure that next time we are ready—not just lucky.
Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) is Chairman of the Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee.

Energizing our economy with nuclear power

Energizing our economy with nuclear power
October 13, 2011 2:30 PM
By Christine Todd Whitman, former EPA administrator and co-chair of the Clean and Safe Energy Coalition

NRC ISSUES LICENSE TO AREVA ENRICHMENT SERVICES FOR

NRC NEWS
NRC ISSUES LICENSE TO AREVA ENRICHMENT SERVICES FOR ... The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a license to AREVA Enrichment ...
www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/news/.../11-196.pdf

Constellation nuke partner EDF opposes Exelon's takeover

Constellation nuke partner EDF opposes Exelon's takeover

NuScale: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of a Nuclear Startup

NuScale: The Rise, Fall, and Rebirth of a Nuclear Startup

Fluor, a huge publicly traded engineering-and-construction firm, has purchased a majority stake in NuScale, a developer of small modular reactors.

Fluor Moves Into Market for Small-sized Nuke Reactors

Fluor Moves Into Market for Small-sized Nuke Reactors

Fluor Becomes Majority Investor in NuScale Power and Enters Small Modular Reactor Market

Fluor Becomes Majority Investor in NuScale Power and Enters Small Modular Reactor Market

NuScale clears its financial path

NuScale clears its financial path

NRC, FirstEnergy concerned about a crack in Davis-Besse's outer containment building

NRC, FirstEnergy concerned about a crack in Davis-Besse's outer containment building

NRC: Blogging about Blogging

Blogging about Blogging

by Moderator
In recent days the NRC broke what for us is new ground on the social media front. In cooperative efforts with two organizations, we hosted two webinar sessions for bloggers with Nuclear Regulatory Chairman Gregory Jaczko.
As communications methods evolve, so too is the way the NRC is communicating. This blog started at the end of January and now has in the vicinity of 140,000 views. We have begun using Twitter and more recently gotten in to the YouTube arena. Each has its own benefits.
This summer the Chairman asked the NRC Public Affairs Office to help him connect with bloggers. The week of Oct. 3 we were able to have two sessions, one of 90 minutes and the other of about 75 minutes.
Two groups – the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), provided organizational assistance, getting the word out into the various communities of bloggers and others interested in nuclear policy issues. Daniel Yurman, representing ANS, and Michele Boyd, representing PSR, graciously agreed to act as facilitators.
The facilitators took all the questions submitted directly to them and their organizations, and those submitted to two NRC email addresses set up for the occasion, merged them into questions that logically flowed from one to another and then hosted the discussions. The choice of questions was theirs and theirs alone. It was a freewheeling conversation with the Chairman. NRC’s only role was to provide the facilities and technology, and offer some assistance in outreach. We’re combing the questions submitted to see if there are any major topic areas that were missed and could be addressed here on the blog.
Collectively the sessions had nearly 80 participants. The first session focused on those with industry ties, and the second on those in the public interest/watchdog sector. The “metrics” of the sessions tell us almost everyone was tuned in the entire time.
The questions were across the spectrum: Fukushima and associated NRC actions, an Inspector General’s report, Yucca Mountain, spent fuel storage, seismic matters, new reactors and so on.
Both sessions were videotaped and transcribed and that material is now available on the NRC website's video page. In fact, in keeping with our expanded use of social media in NRC communications, bits of both sessions are being posted to YouTube.
Participant comments we have seen describe it as worthwhile and productive outreach. The chairman came away excited about the chance to spend time with bloggers. Schedules permitting, we look forward to doing this again at some point in the future. Thanks to the ANS and PSR for their assistance, and to all who took time to participate.
Eliot Brenner
Director, Office of Public Affairs
Moderator | October 13, 2011 at 3:34 pm | Tags: nuclear | Categories: General | URL: http://wp.me/p1fSSY-sZ

Nixon Legacy Forum: Responding to the Energy Crisis

Subject: Nixon Legacy Forum: Responding to the Energy Crisis


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Nixon Legacy Forum: Responding to the Energy Crisis
Panel discussion with former Nixon cabinet officials including:
Richard Fairbanks
Trustee, Counselor, and Former President, CSIS;
Associate Director, White House Domestic Council for Energy and Natural Resources;
Former Ambassador at Large
James R. Schlesinger Jr.
Trustee and Counselor, CSIS; Former Chairman, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission; Former Director, Central Intelligence Agency; Former U.S. Secretary of Energy;
Former U.S. Secretary of Defense
James J. Tozzi
Founder and Director, Center for Regulatory Effectiveness;
Former Chief of Environment, Assistant Director, and Deputy Director, U.S. Office of Management and Budget
Moderated by
Guy F. Caruso
Senior Adviser, Energy and National Security Program, CSIS;
Former Administrator, Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy

Wednesday, October 19, 2011, 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
B1 A/B Conference Room, CSIS
1800 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006
Please RSVP to nixonfoundation.org.
Cosponsored by the Richard Nixon Foundation, the National Archives, and CSIS. Please join us for a lively discussion on how the 37th president responded to America's most serious energy crisis since World War II.

Cold War's nuclear wastes pose challenges to science, engineering, society

Cold War's nuclear wastes pose challenges to science, engineering, society

Miami FL (SPX) Oct 13, 2011
Seven papers published in the current issue of Technology and Innovation, Proceedings of the National Academy of Inventors report on efforts by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure continued safe and secure storage and disposition of 50 years worth of spent nuclear fuel, surplus nuclear materials, and high-level wastes at DOE facilities.
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A Study in Nuclear Success, A Review of “Nuclear Silk Road: The ‘Koreanization’ of Nuclear Power Technology” by Dr. Kim Byung-Koo

A Study in Nuclear Success, A Review of “Nuclear Silk Road: The ‘Koreanization’ of Nuclear Power Technology” by Dr. Kim Byung-Koo

By Robert Margolis

Ansaldo joins heavy component partnership

Ansaldo joins heavy component partnership
12 October 2011
Italy's Ansaldo Nucleare has agreed to become a partner in a UK alliance to design and build heavy modules and components for new nuclear plants.

Nuclear Power Likely to Grow, Royal Society Says, So Nations Should Plan Ahead

Nuclear Power Likely to Grow, Royal Society Says, So Nations Should Plan Ahead

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Not enough, too fast Public needs more time to digest state�s energy plan

Not enough, too fast

Public needs more time to digest state�s energy plan

Panel: Japan-level nuclear crisis possible at San Onofre

Panel: Japan-level nuclear crisis possible at San Onofre

San Clemente City Council hosts a nearly five-hour community meeting featuring speakers organized by San Clemente Green on lessons learned from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster.

NRC ISSUES LICENSE TO AREVA ENRICHMENT SERVICES FOR GAS CENTRIFUGE URANIUM ENRICHMENT PLANT IN IDAHO

NRC ISSUES LICENSE TO AREVA ENRICHMENT SERVICES FOR GAS CENTRIFUGE URANIUM ENRICHMENT PLANT IN IDAHO

No. 11-196 October 12, 2011

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a license to AREVA Enrichment Services LLC (AES) to construct and operate a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment plant in Bonneville County, Idaho.

The license for the Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility authorizes AES to enrich uranium up to 5 percent by weight in the fissile isotope U-235 for use in the manufacture of nuclear fuel for commercial nuclear power reactors. AES plans to begin construction in 2012.

AES submitted its application Dec. 30, 2008. The NRC staff completed thorough safety and environmental reviews of the proposed facility. A Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-1951) was published in September 2010, with the staff’s conclusion that AES’s proposed facility complies with NRC regulations and would not pose an undue risk to the health and safety of workers or the public. An Environmental Impact Statement (NUREG-1945) was published in February 2011, with the determination that there would be no significant environmental impacts that would preclude licensing of the facility.

The AES application, as well as the Safety Evaluation Report and Environmental Impact Statement, are available on the NRC website.

A three-judge Atomic Safety and Licensing Board conducted a hearing on the AES application, with evidentiary sessions on the safety review in January 2011 and on the environmental review in July. The ASLB issued its decision authorizing the staff to issue the license Oct. 7.

The NRC staff will conduct inspections during the construction and operation of the Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility. The agency plans to hold a public meeting in Idaho Falls before construction begins to explain its oversight plans to members of the public.

The "scientization" of Yucca Mountain

The "scientization" of Yucca Mountain

When I first stood atop Nevada's Yucca Mountain more than 16 years ago, the Energy Department was spending about $1 million a day to assess the feasibility of safely storing spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste there. A steel-toothed tunneling machine had already begun chewing its way into the ridge, and some 300 scientists were on-site studying the area's underground trickles, its porous rock, its lumbering desert tortoises, and a few reddish-black cinder cones that dotted the landscape below -- the ominous tombstones of ancient volcanic eruptions.

US NRC urged to act quickly on lessons from Fukushima accident

US NRC urged to act quickly on lessons from Fukushima accident

EDF asks state regulators to reject Constellation merger

EDF asks state regulators to reject Constellation merger

French utility is Constellation's nuclear partner and second-largest stakeholder

South Carolina plans nuclear research centre

South Carolina plans nuclear research centre

A new Centre of Economic Excellence is to be established at the University of South Carolina (USC) to develop strategies for enhancing the use of nuclear energy, university officials have announced. Nuclear technology company General Atomics will donate $900,000 to establish the General Atomics Centre for Development of Transformational Nuclear Technologies, while the state of South Carolina will provide funds of $3 million through the Centre of Economic Excellence program, itself funded through South Carolina Educational Lottery proceeds. The new centre will be within USC's College of Engineering and Computing. It will study "technologies tied to recycling of used fuel, better resource utilization and waste reduction, as well as technologies for faster and less expensive construction of nuclear plants." USC president Harris Pastides said, "Researchers at this centre will work to ensure that nuclear power remains safe, clean and affordable and, in the course of their work, help train a new generation of nuclear engineers for this growing industry."

Here are two sites that are worth looking at... and which are PRO-NUCLEAR!


Here are two sites that are worth looking at... and which are PRO-NUCLEAR!

Nuclear Friends Foundation is located in India, and has as its focus the developing nuclear energy industry in that country. However, much of their information is wholly applicable elsewhere.

What is Nuclear? This site has as its mandate the "no-nonsense public education on the use of nuclear energy to help with the energy problem." Lots of information easily read on this site.

US Energy Policy and the NRC from ATOMIC POWER REVIEW by Will Davis

US Energy Policy and the NRC

from ATOMIC POWER REVIEW

IAEA Chief Visits Asian Nations

IAEA Chief Visits Asian Nations

IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano visits cyclotron facility in Viet Nam October 2011
In the past week, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano paid official visits to Viet Nam, Thailand, and Indonesia.
Viet Nam
In Viet Nam, the Director General met the Deputy Prime Minister, Vu Van Ninh; the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Pham Bình Minh; the Minister for Science and Technology, Nguyen Quan, among other Government officials.
During his two-day stay from 3 to 4 October 2011, he also visited a cancer treatment centre that utilizes a PET-Cyclotron and Cyberknife. In addition, the Director General met the press.
Thailand
On 4 October 2011, the Director General began a two-day visit to Thailand, which included meetings with the Minister for Energy, Pichai Naripthaphan, and the Minister for Science and Technology, Plodprasop Suraswadi, as well as Somsak Kiatsuranont, President of the National Assembly and Speaker of the House of Representatives of Thailand, and Members of the National Assembly. In addition, the Director General met the press.
His visit included a briefing at the Queen Sirikit Centre for Breast Cancer at the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.
Indonesia
In Indonesia during his two-day official visit from 6 to 9 October 2011, the Director General met the Vice President, Prof Dr Boediono; State Minister for Research and Technology, Suharna Surapranata; the Minister of Health, Endang Rahayu Sedyaningsih; and the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dr R.M.Marty M. Natalegawa; among other Government officials.
At the Ministry of Research and Technology, Director General Amano delivered a lecture that provided an overview of the Agency's work in nuclear safety, nuclear power, non-proliferation, nuclear security, the peaceful uses of nuclear applications. He said, "the IAEA has a large and active technical cooperation programme in Indonesia, supporting many peaceful nuclear applications in human health, agriculture, water and other areas". The Director General also met the press.
In addition, he participated in the opening ceremony for a cancer control and therapy facility at Dharmais Cancer Hospital and visited the Centre for Isotope and Radiation in Jakarta.
See Story Resources for more information.
-- By Peter Kaiser, IAEA Division of Public Information

Update on IAEA International Remediation Expert Mission in Japan

Update on IAEA International Remediation Expert Mission in Japan

The IAEA International Remediation Expert Mission examines Reactor Unit 3 during the team's visit today to TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power plant. (Photo Credit: G. Verlini/IAEA)
An IAEA international expert mission is visiting Japan to help the country develop its remediation plans, following the nuclear accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.
The mission, requested by the Japanese Government, comprises 12 international experts from several countries and IAEA experts who are visiting Japan from 7 to 15 October 2011.
Today, 11 October 2011, the mission visited the accident site at TEPCO's Fukushima's Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. In the morning, the mission had paid a courtesy visit to the Governor of the Fukushima Prefecture.
Following the conclusion of the visit to the Fukushima Prefecture, the IAEA Mission Team returned to Tokyo where it is due to hold further meetings with Japanese officials and draft its preliminary report. The team is led by Juan Carlos Lentijo, the General Director for Radiation Protection at Spain's nuclear regulatory authority.
9 - 10 October 2011
On their arrival in Fukushima on 9 October, the team met members of the Fukushima Decontamination Team as well as staff from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) Fukushima office for a briefing on the environmental remediation efforts underway in the area.
In the afternoon of the same day, the team visited the area surrounding the Haramachi thermal power plant in the city of Minamisouma. The city, once a renowned holiday destination, was badly affected by the tsunami that hit Japan's east coast on 11 March 2011.
The team then visited a remediation model site located in the hills inland from the city of Minamisouma, where methods and technologies for the remediation of forestry areas are being evaluated.
On 10 October 2011, the team visited four locations where model remediation projects are being carried out by the Fukushima Decontamination Team and JAEA. These include the Tominari Elementary school and the Shimooguni Central Assembly Hall, both located in the city of Date.
The team also visited on the same day two sites where verification studies for the application of remediation technologies in agriculture are being conducted. Both sites are located in the territory of the village of Iitate.
At one site, rice has been planted in a paddy where a layer of earth with elevated levels of radiocesium was removed from the top soil.
In a near-by site known as Iitate village clear centre, the team received a briefing on a series of tests that are being carried out on the combustion of crops and soil with elevated levels of radioactivity.
At all of these demonstration sites, experts are evaluating the efficiency of a number of methods and technologies that can be used in environmental remediation strategies.
Background
The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has led to the radiological contamination of large areas. The Government of Japan has been formulating a strategy and plans to implement countermeasures to remediate these areas.
The IAEA organized an International Fact Finding Expert Mission of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, which was conducted between 24 May and 2 June 2011.
The current mission is a follow-up to the fact finding mission held earlier in the year.
The IAEA's International Remediation Expert Mission to Japan is an essential component of the IAEA's Nuclear Safety Action Plan, approved by the IAEA Board of Governors on 13 September and endorsed by all 151 Member States at the recent IAEA General Conference in September 2011. The Action Plan defines a programme of work to strengthen the global nuclear safety framework.
The final report of the International Remediation Expert Mission will be presented to the Japanese Government in the month following the conclusion of the mission.
See Story Resources for more information.
-- By Giovanni Verlini, IAEA Division of Public Information

DG Calls for Nuclear Weapons Free World


DG Calls for Nuclear Weapons Free World

DG in Kazakhstan
IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano delivered an address at the Nuclear Weapons Free World Conference held on 12 October 2011 in Astana, Kazakhstan.
In his address to the International Conference for a Nuclear Weapons Free World, IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano said, "As a human being, as Director General of the IAEA - and not least as a citizen of the only country ever to experience the unspeakable horror of nuclear bombs - I believe with all my heart and soul that these horrific weapons must be eliminated." He spoke at the opening of the Conference for a Nuclear-Weapons-Free World held in Astana, Kazakhstan on 12 October 2011.
The Conference's opening address was delivered by Nursultan Nazarbayev, President of the Republic of Kazakhstan. It was followed by a video address by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and a statement by US President Barack Obama, delivered by US Deputy Secretary of Energy, Daniel Poneman. Tibor Tóth, Executive Secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Organization, also addressed the Conference.
In his remarks, the IAEA Director General commended Kazakhstan's very important contribution to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. He noted that, under the leadership of President Nazarbayev, Kazakhstan had renounced the nuclear weapons which it inherited from the Soviet Union and closed the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, where over 450 underground and atmospheric nuclear tests had been conducted. Kazakhstan had joined the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons as a non-nuclear-weapon State and concluded both a safeguards agreement and an additional protocol with the IAEA.
Kazakhstan also "played a significant role in establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia" in 2009, the Director General said. The treaty establishing the nuclear-weapon-free zone created an important precedent in that it is the only arms control treaty to date that requires its parties to bring into force an additional protocol to their IAEA safeguards agreements, he added.
The Director General also reiterated his own Nagasaki Commitment to work for a world free of all nuclear weapons, which he made last year at the Nagasaki Peace Ceremony marking the 65th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan. The Nagasaki Commitment foresees four active roles for the IAEA: to play a role in nuclear disarmament through verification, to support the creation of new Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones and help to implement them, to continue verification activities to check that nuclear materials from civilian nuclear programmes are not diverted to nuclear weapons, and to redouble efforts to work with countries to help prevent nuclear materials from falling into the hands of terrorist groups.
Background
The International Conference on a Nuclear Weapons Free World, held in Astana, Kazakhstan from 12 to 13 October 2011, marked the 20th anniversary of the closure of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.
The treaty establishing the Central Asian nuclear-weapon-free zone is supported by the IAEA and forbids the development, manufacture, stockpiling, acquisition or possession of any nuclear explosive device within the zone. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy are permitted if placed under enhanced IAEA safeguards. The treaty also requires Parties to meet international standards regarding security of nuclear facilities. This is intended to reduce the risk of nuclear terrorism and prevent smuggling of nuclear and radioactive materials in the region.
See Story Resources for more information.
-- By Peter Kaiser, IAEA Division of Public Information

Iran Containment Cast in Doubt

Iran Containment Cast in Doubt


WASHINGTON -- The de facto U.S. strategy of containing an Iran on the cusp of acquiring nuclear weapons may have just gotten a lot more dangerous. That strategy of isolating Tehran internationally, and building an anti-Iran alliance along its periphery protected by the U.S. nuclear umbrella, relied on the “rationale actor” theory of international relations. Under such circumstances, the strategy assumed that even an Iran with nuclear weapons could not unduly intimidate its neighbors. Crossing a clear U.S. redline by passing those weapons to allied terrorist groups such as Hezbollah would invite annihilation (see GSN, Oct. 11).
If it proves true, Tuesday's announcement by senior Obama administration officials that the Quds Force -- the elite special-operations unit of Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard -- was linked to a plot to assassinate the Saudi Arabian ambassador to the United States in Washington, D.C., and subsequently bomb the Saudi and Israeli embassies here, clearly crossed a post-9/11 redline.

Japan Nuclear Plant Cleanup to Cover Thousands of Miles

Japan Nuclear Plant Cleanup to Cover Thousands of Miles

Roughly 5,000 square miles of Japanese territory would be covered by a national program to remove radioactive material released by the Fukushima Daiichi atomic facility, the Asahi Shimbun reported on Wednesday (see GSN, Oct. 11).

Iran Continues Atomic Site Construction: Satellite Images

Iran Continues Atomic Site Construction: Satellite Images

Satellite pictures viewable through Google Earth indicate Iran is moving forward with construction at a heavy-water facility it could tap in extracting weapon-usable plutonium, the Institute for Science and International Security said on Tuesday (see GSN, Oct. 11).

State Labs Lack Capabilities for Radiological Crisis: Study

State Labs Lack Capabilities for Radiological Crisis: Study

Significant holes persist at U.S. state public health laboratories in key capabilities for responding to a radiological crisis, warns an analysis published on Wednesday of two sets of data collected by the Association of Public Health Laboratories (see GSN, Sept. 21).

U.S. Nuclear Energy Industry Aligned With Short-Term NRC Priorities Industry/Regulatory/Political Issues

U.S. Nuclear Energy Industry Aligned With Short-Term NRC Priorities

Industry/Regulatory/Political Issues

New Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Video Shows Damaged Roof of Unit 1

New Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant Video Shows Damaged Roof of Unit 1

Growing Republican Support for Energy Innovation

Growing Republican Support for Energy Innovation

One year ago, scholars from the American Enterprise Institute, Breakthrough Institute, and Brookings Institution called on Congress to reform energy subsidies so they specifically fund innovation and not simply greater production of old technologies. "The death of cap and trade doesn't have to mean the death of climate policy," wrote David Leonhardt in The New York Times. "The alternative revolves around much more, and much better organized, financing for clean energy research. It's an idea with a growing list of supporters, a list that even includes conservatives most of whom opposed cap and trade."
Since then, the list of
Read more...

Why the Debate Over Global Warming is Academic

Why the Debate Over Global Warming is Academic

The Government Response to the Consultation on the Draft National ...

 

The Government Response to the Consultation on the Draft National ...

www.decc.gov.uk/...energy.../1945-govt-resp-consultation-on-nps.p...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat
May 18, 2011 – The Government Response to. Consultation on the Revised Draft. National Policy Statements for. Energy Infrastructure.

Fukushima and the UK nuclear industry Introduction

Fukushima and the UK nuclear industry

Introduction

In March 2011 Japan suffered one of the worst natural disasters in its history when a massive earthquake and tsunami hit the country.  This led to a serious nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-chi site with repercussions felt across the international community.
Mike Weightman, chief inspector of nuclear installations and head of the Office for Nuclear Regulation, reported on the implications for the UK nuclear industry following a request from the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. 
On this web page you will find the full report, along with the interim version, as well as related information, news and updates.

Link URLs in this page

  1. Full report [6.4MB]
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/final-report.pdf
  2. Press release
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/final-report.htm
  3. Interim report on the Japanese earthquake and tsunami: Implications for the UK nuclear industry
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/interim-report.pdf
  4. Video: Mike Weightman interview
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/final-report-video.htm
  5. European Council "Stress Tests" for UK Nuclear Power Plants National
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/stress-tests.pdf
  6. Technical Advisory Panel (TAP)
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/tap.htm
  7. Submissions of information
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/submissions/index.htm
  8. Written Ministerial Statement by Chris Huhne, Secretary of State
    http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/news/weightmann_wms/weightmann_wms.aspx
  9. Chief Nuclear Inspector publishes interim 'lessons learnt' report
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/interim-report.htm
  10. Invitation to submit information on the implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident (Update)
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/invitiation-180511.htm
  11. New UK nuclear reactor designs to consider Japan report
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/newreactors/gda-japan.htm
  12. Invitation to submit information on the implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/invitiation-040411.htm
  13. Statement from HM Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations on the implications of the Fukushima nuclear accident
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/fukushima/statement-290311.htm

Weightman Warns Nuclear Industry To Do More Research from The Energy Collective - The world's best thinkers on energy & climate by David K Thorpe

Weightman Warns Nuclear Industry To Do More Research

from The Energy Collective - The world's best thinkers on energy & climate

NEI Fires Back At New Jersey Newsroom's Coverage of Security at Indian Point

NEI Fires Back At New Jersey Newsroom's Coverage of Security at Indian Point

Yesterday, Roger Witherspoon of New Jersey Newsroom took yet another hack at the nuclear energy industry, this time using security at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant to grind his axe. Here's what NEI's Steve Kerekes had to say in the comments section following the article:
The writer conveniently ignores the $2 billion in security enhancements made across the U.S. nuclear energy industry over the past decade. Since that doesn't rate as so much as a "prong" in the writer's eyes, savvy readers shouldn't have much difficulty discerning the agenda behind this selective "reporting." Similarly, there was nothing voluntary about the security orders that were imposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission after the 9/11 terrorist attacks that every U.S. nuclear energy facility implemented by the NRC's October 2004 deadline (see http://www.nei.org/newsandevents/nrcdeadline/).

The phrase "reader beware" seems appropriate where this reporting is concerned. Our nation needs a comprehensive energy policy rooted in facts, not half-truths and mischaracterizations disguised as something else.
For more on nuclear power plant security, please visit NEI's website.

The True Costs of Coal and Nuclear Energy from RealClearReligion - Homepage by Andreas Spath, News24

The True Costs of Coal and Nuclear Energy

from RealClearReligion - Homepage

Special Report: Energy In Quest for Power, Nuclear Is a Disunifying Force By JAMES KANTER

Special Report: Energy

In Quest for Power, Nuclear Is a Disunifying Force

Think Again: Nuclear Power Japan melted down, but that doesn't mean the end of the atomic age.

Think Again: Nuclear Power

Japan melted down, but that doesn't mean the end of the atomic age.

Tokyo Electric Power: Ethical Meltdown

Tokyo Electric Power: Ethical Meltdown
Jon Entine
June 1, 2011
Tokyo Electric Power has a history of mismanagement and serious safety lapses

Japan Courts the Money in Reactors By HIROKO TABUCHI

Japan Courts the Money in Reactors

In Japan, a Long-Term Study on Radiation Leaks’ Effects

In Japan, a Long-Term Study on Radiation Leaks’ Effects

Ignorance Stifles Innovation in Solving Energy Problems By MICHELLE MICHOT FOSS

Ignorance Stifles Innovation in Solving Energy Problems

Japan's Ongoing Nuclear Disaster: Radiation Still Leaking, Recovery Still Years Away

Japan’s Nuclear Disaster: Radiation Still Leaking, Recovery Still Years Away?

by Richard Wilcox /

China to lead in new nuclear reactors?

China to lead in new nuclear reactors?
Beijing (UPI) Oct 11, 2011 - While most of the world takes a step back from nuclear power in the wake of the disaster in northern Japan, China is continuing on a path of nuclear power expansion. An earthquake and tsunami last spring wrecked a nuclear power plant at Fukushima, causing an environmental problem that is far from over. That caused many countries - notably Germany - to stop nuclear power plant c ... more

Rep. Stearns: US ‘can’t compete with China’ on green energy programs

Rep. Stearns: US ‘can’t compete with China’ on green energy programs

Updates from ANS Nuclear Cafe Blog The Pro-Nuclear Community goes Grassroots

Updates from ANS Nuclear Cafe Blog
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American Nuclear Society

The Pro-Nuclear Community goes Grassroots

By lscheele on Oct 12, 2011 01:00 am

By Suzy Hobbs Baker In recent weeks I have been excited to witness several genuine grassroots efforts in support of nuclear energy emerging on the scene. Several have already been covered on this forum, like the Rally for Vermont Yankee … Continue reading
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