Michele Kearney's Nuclear Wire

Major Energy and Environmental News and Commentary affecting the Nuclear Industry.

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

oig-report.pdf - Report on Clinton Email Server

UNCLASSIFIED
UNCLASSIFIED
ESP
-16-
03
Office of Evaluations and Special Projects
May
2016
Office of the Secretary: Evaluation of
Email Records Management and
Cybersecurity Requirements




oig-report.pdf

French nuclear plants to go on strike Thursday - CGT union | Daily Mail Online

French nuclear plants to go on strike Thursday - CGT union | Daily Mail Online

EIA Today in Energy Germany’s renewables electricity generation grows in 2015, but coal still dominant

Today in Energy

Germany’s renewables electricity generation grows in 2015, but coal still dominant

graph of Germany gross electricity generation by fuel source, as explained in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on German Statistical Office (Destatis) and AGEB- AG Energiebilanzen e.V.

Renewable electricity generation in Germany increased to 194 billion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2015, representing 31% of the country's gross electricity generation. The renewables electricity growth in 2015 was the largest in both percentage and absolute terms (19% and 32 billion kWh, respectively) in at least a decade.
Germany's Energiewende, or energy transition policy, focuses on renewable energy and sustainable development. Energiewende goals include eliminating nonrenewable energy sources from Germany's energy portfolio, phasing out nuclear power generation, reducing dependence on energy imports, and lowering carbon emissions. Official goals call for greenhouse gas reductions to 80% to 95% of 1990 levels by 2050 and a gradual phase-out of nuclear power by 2022. In 2015, 44% of Germany's electricity production was generated from coal, 11% from other fossil fuels, and 15% from nuclear energy.
Electricity generated from renewable sources has tripled in Germany over the past 10 years. Based on Energiewende goals, the share of power generated from renewable sources is set to increase to 40% to 45% by 2025 and to more than 80% by 2050. Most of Germany's expected growth in renewable electricity comes from solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind, which currently provide 20% of Germany's total electricity. Hydropower and other renewables such as biomass and waste provided 11% of Germany's overall electricity supply in 2015, but these shares are not expected to grow significantly.
The German government has supported renewable electricity growth by promising a fixed, above-market price for every kilowatthour of energy generated by solar PV or wind and delivered to the grid, a policy known as a feed-in tariff. By law, these renewable sources have priority over traditional generation, meaning that other forms of generation must be curtailed to accommodate fluctuations in renewable electricity generation. Over the past five years, these policies have helped to double the amount of wind generation.
Wholesale electricity prices in Germany have been declining, but residential retail prices have risen and are expected to continue to increase because of higher taxes and fees charged to consumers. For instance, one surcharge for renewable electricity increased from 8.8% of the residential electricity price in 2010 to 17% in 2013. Taxes and surcharges make up about half of the average residential electricity rate, and tariffs account for the remainder. In 2014, the average sales-weighted retail price for residential consumption in Germany was about 35 cents/kWh, while the average residential retail price in the United States was about 13 cents/kWh. Along with Denmark, Germany has among the highest residential electricity prices in Europe.
As a net electricity exporter, Germany's rapid growth in electricity production has created problems for both Germany and its neighbors. Germany currently lacks the infrastructure to send surplus electricity from the north to the more populous areas in the south. A large volume of the surplus power instead flows through transmission grids to Germany's neighbors, often creating power surges. Poland and the Czech Republic have invested in technology to avoid blackouts from power surges that originate in Germany on particularly windy days. Germany has identified the need for more than 3,800 kilometers of new transmission lines that would run from the north to the south of Germany to meet increasing growth in both electricity demand and supply, but these infrastructure proposals have been opposed by municipalities and citizens.
Last year Germany signed several agreements with its neighbors to integrate power markets and to eliminate overcapacity of the grid. The electricity grid problems in Germany reflect a larger, continentwide problem that has been elevated to the European Commission in Brussels, where policy makers advised that an integrated, renewables-focused electricity market should be a political priority for the European Union.
Germany has made several changes to its energy policies to promote renewable growth while also controlling costs. In 2014, changes were made to the feed-in tariffs. In the future, instead of fixed tariffs, electricity producers may have to compete in auctions. If renewable growth targets are exceeded in a given year, the feed-in tariff incentives for the following year would decrease to balance the growth.
Principal contributor: Sara Hoff

NEA 2016: Preparing for New Reactor Development [VIDEO]

Posted: 24 May 2016 09:00 PM PDT
On May 24, 2016 during the afternoon session of the Nuclear Energy Assembly, there was a panel discussion on the topic of preparing for new reactor development. NEI’s Chief Operating Officer, Maria Korsnick, moderated the panel. Other participants included
  • Jacob DeWitt, CEO and co-founder of Oklo, a start-up company with a design for a 2 MWe nuclear generator designed for remote power applications where diesel generators are the only available option
  • John Hopkins, CEO of NuScale Power, a maturing start-up company that will be submitting its design certification application for its 50 MWe NuScale module by the end of this year
  • Stephen Kuczynski, CEO of Southern Nuclear, a company with six large operating reactors and two more under construction at Plant Vogtle
  • Lee McIntire, the CEO of TerraPower, an innovation company with a focus on nuclear energy that is currently working on a traveling wave reactor and a molten chloride salt reactor
  • Cynthia Pezze, Chief Technology Officer for Westinghouse, one of the first nuclear plant vendors in the world and the developer of the basic PWR technology that is used in more than half of the current nuclear plants in the world.
I’m planning come back and modify this post later with some commentary. For now, I thought that some readers might like the “hot off the press” feel of watching a discussion that just occurred a few hours ago at an industry conference in Miami.
If you do take the time to watch the discussion, here’s a game you can play. Jot down any comments or discussion points that the panelists made that seem familiar based on your status as an Atomic Insights reader.
The post NEA 2016 – Preparing for new reactor development appeared first on Atomic Insights.
Rod Adams

Target coal or carbon?

Target coal or carbon?

Researchers are analyzing coal and energy caps as carbon policy instruments for China.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/target-coal-or-carbon-0524

Nuclear power in more trouble than oil - Houston Chronicle

Nuclear power in more trouble than oil - Houston Chronicle

Spent fuel fire on U.S. soil could dwarf impact of Fukushima | Science | AAAS

Spent fuel fire on U.S. soil could dwarf impact of Fukushima | Science | AAAS

National Academy study says nuclear fuel pools vulnerable


  • National Academy study says nuclear fuel pools vulnerable

  • A new study says the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should re-evaluate the safety of spent fuel pools.

http://plymouth.wickedlocal.com/article/20160525/NEWS/160528032

Nuclear threats in US worse than previously known — study

Nuclear threats in US worse than previously known — study


https://www.rt.com/usa/344264-nuclear-threats-worse-study/

Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: Obama in Hiroshima

On Friday, May 27, President Barack Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, Japan, site of the first atomic bomb detonation in history. Amid the debate over the visit—will he or won’t he go; will he or won’t he meet with the Hibakusha; will he or won’t he apologize—it is clear that his visit is a monumentally historic event that will force the world to consider again the destructive consequences of nuclear weapons.

Below, we’ve assembled a reading list on the subject of the only uses of nuclear weapons in history, and what this visit by President Obama means to people in the U.S., Japan, and around the world. To help tackle the big questions raised, we are highlighting some of our best and most recent analysis.

What President Obama should say at Hiroshima, by Hugh Gusterson

Let Hiroshima guide us back to nuclear basics, by Kennette Benedict

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Lessons learned? Development and Disarmament Roundtable
 
Where will the next president stand on nuclear weapons? by Rachel Whitlark

Hiroshima and the Iran agreement, by Rachel Bronson

Can Japan become a bridge-builder for nuclear disarmament? by Masako Toki

The weight of a butterfly, by Emily Strasser

At Hiroshima, lay plans for a nuclear-weapon-free world, by Kennette Benedict

T
he harrowing story of the Nagasaki bombing mission, by Ellen Bradbury and Sandra Blakeslee

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: The many retrospectives, by Dan Drollette

A picture's power to prevent, by Seth Baum

Comics, graphic novels, and the nuclear age, by Ariane Tabatabai

Nuclear Notebook Interactive: Our infographic of the world's nuclear arsenal

2016 Doomsday Clock Statement

Vernon’s fate gets turn in spotlight at national nuclear summit

Vernon’s fate gets turn in spotlight at national nuclear summit


http://vtdigger.org/2016/05/24/vernons-fate-gets-turn-in-spotlight-at-national-nuclear-summit/

NEA 2016 – Preparing for new reactor development

 

NEA 2016 – Preparing for new reactor development

http://atomicinsights.com/nea-2016-preparing-new-reactor-development/

DOE Recognizes Two EM Sites with Awards

DOE Office of Environmental Management

EM News Flash | May 25, 2016


p
Among the items the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization is making available for beneficial reuse from the Savannah River Site are 653 excess refrigerant containing units.

DOE Recognizes Two EM Sites with Awards

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Teams at two EM sites have been recognized with 2016 Energy Sustainability Awards for spearheading projects that have saved taxpayer dollars while promoting efficiency and smart use of DOE resources.
   The DOE Sustainability Performance Office highlighted efforts at the Oak Ridge and Savannah River sites as outstanding contributions to the Department’s goal of improving environmental, energy, and economic performance while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
   At Savannah River, a partnership between the site and the Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) has provided an opportunity for thousands of pieces of no-longer-needed equipment and other excess government-owned items to be made available for beneficial use to local governments, nonprofits, and private businesses.
   “To give you an idea of the range of items that have been donated and put to good use over the years, we’re talking about piping, a waste debris pelletizer, electronics, furniture, copper wire, motor generators, air conditioners and even an air boat and locomotive engine,” said Parodio Maith, DOE-Savannah River (DOE-SR) community assistance manager. “If items are not needed somewhere within the DOE complex or at another U.S. government agency, these excess items are made available to the SRSCRO.” 
   Items not selected are sold for profit that may be used to promote local business development and the DOE mission. In 2014, SRSCRO disbursed about $1 million for infrastructure improvement projects in its region.
   In 2015, DOE-SR and the site’s management and operations contractor Savannah River Nuclear Solutions initiated an agreement with SRSCRO on new “assets for services” projects to remove difficult-to-manage excess and surplus items.  
   Through the program, SRSCRO disassembled 12 large transformers and four oil-filled circuit breakers from a now-closed power plant within the site’s D Area for recovery of 678,000 pounds of copper and other metals and 56,921 gallons of transformer oil. SRSCRO also is removing 38 excess office trailers and 653 excess refrigerant units including ice-makers, heating and ventilating components, refrigerators and water coolers, and fire retardant held in 31 cylinders. 
   Savannah River personnel singled out for recognition were Maith, John Harley, Andrew Albenesius, and Rick McLeod.

p
An aerial view of Oak Ridge's third solar array development, built by a team honored with a DOE Sustainability Award.

   URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), the prime contractor for Oak Ridge’s EM program, helped the small business subcontractor Restoration Services Inc. team with community partners to build a 1 megawatt utility scale photovoltaic power generating project called Powerhouse Six that became operational in April 2015.
   It’s the third, and largest, solar array at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), where the last of five gaseous diffusion buildings is being demolished. Under EM’s reindustrialization program, property at ETTP is being transferred to the private sector to make the site an industrial park.
   The solar plant generates enough clean energy to power more than 100 homes while preventing pollution that is the equivalent to removing 240 cars from the road annually.
   Powerhouse Six was developed through a partnership between RSI and solar firm Vis Solis, Inc., and community partners, the City of Oak Ridge, and the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee.
   Oak Ridge personnel earning recognition were Caroline Barber, Gil Hough, Betsy Child, Cathy Hickey, Gill Sallade, John Seale, and Perry Spurling.

Now you can see if your LinkedIn account was caught up in 2012 hack | ZDNet

Now you can see if your LinkedIn account was caught up in 2012 hack | ZDNet

Alliance brings Russian fuel to US market

Alliance brings Russian fuel to US market

Is the EPR Nuclear Reactor Fit for the Current Market?

Is the EPR Nuclear Reactor Fit for the Current Market?

Radiation and Reason

Radiation and Reason

Economics Of New Nuclear Make Sense For South Africa, Says Eskom CEO

Economics Of New Nuclear Make Sense For South Africa, Says Eskom CEO

US eyes European reactors market

US eyes European reactors market

Russia's Maiden Nuclear Icebreaker to Be Floated Out in Mid-2016

Russia's Maiden Nuclear Icebreaker to Be Floated Out in Mid-2016

NRC Blog Update: The 411 on NRC Fees for Licensees

The 411 on NRC Fees for Licensees

Michele Kaplan
Team Leader
License Fee Policy Team
questionnewThe NRC is an independent agency chartered by Congress to regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials. By law, we’re required to recover 90 percent of our budget from the companies and people that we provide services to (such as applicants for licenses, operating nuclear power plants that we inspect, etc.)
The two main laws that govern NRC’s fee recovery are called the Independent Offices Appropriation Act of 1952, and the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990, as amended.
Here are some common questions (and answers) about the NRC’s fee structure and process.
Q. Does the NRC get all of its funding from the fees that it charges?
A. No, all NRC funding is appropriated by Congress. The 90 percent of our budget that we collect in fees is paid to the U.S. Treasury. This is called “cost recovery.”
Q. How are the NRC’s budget and the NRC’s fees related?
A. Each year, Congress decides the amount of the NRC’s budget. As our budget increases or decreases, or as the number of applicants and licensees increases or decreases, the amount that must still be recovered from fees may cause the fees to go up or down in a given year.
Q. How does the NRC determine the amount of the fees?
A. The NRC goes through a rulemaking process each year that describes the cost recovery process and allows members of the public to comment on the proposed fees, which is then followed by publication of the final fees.
Q. What are the different types of fees?
A. There are hourly and annual fees. Hourly fees are charged according to how much work the NRC performs for a particular applicant or license. For example, a company with a reactor license may pay $5 million in annual fees, and, in addition, may pay $200,000 for hourly fees because they asked the NRC to review and approve an amendment to their license. Annual fees recover regulatory costs not directly attributed to a licensing action or oversight of a specific license.
budgetQ. What is the hourly staff fee?
A. Currently, the staff fee is $268 per hour. This hourly rate includes the internal costs that are necessary to operate the agency, such as human resources, rent, computer support, etc. Our fees are published every year and the current fees can be found here.
Q. If I want to submit something to the NRC for review, can you tell me what the review will cost?
A. It depends. For some applications, such as import licenses or sealed sources, the NRC charges a flat fee to complete the entire review. For other applications, the NRC charges hourly rates for the full amount of time that agency staff spends on the review of that particular application. Some applications require more review than others.
Q. Are there exceptions for small businesses?
A. Yes, the NRC does take into consideration “small entities.” Please see more information here.
Q. How much does it cost to get a new reactor design certified by the NRC?
A. The two reactor designs most recently certified by the NRC resulted in fees of between $45 million and $70 million. These costs included hourly fees for pre-application interactions between NRC and the applicant, the NRC’s review of the application itself, and the NRC’s review of application revisions that were submitted by the applicant.
Q. What if I want to discuss a potential application with the NRC but don’t have the money to pay large fees?
A. You’re encouraged to call or email the NRC staff to discuss your questions or to set up a meeting. Short, infrequent meetings of a general nature may not be billed. However, more in-depth or technical meetings, or activities such as the review of applications, will incur fees.

Environmental Group Wants Indian Point Nuclear Plant Shut Down « CBS New York

Environmental Group Wants Indian Point Nuclear Plant Shut Down « CBS New York

Next Big Future: ARPA-E seeks Enabling Technologies for Ultra-Safe and Secure Modular Nuclear Energy Systems

Next Big Future: ARPA-E seeks Enabling Technologies for Ultra-Safe and Secure Modular Nuclear Energy Systems

World could warm by massive 10C if all fossil fuels are burned | Environment | The Guardian

World could warm by massive 10C if all fossil fuels are burned | Environment | The Guardian

Next Big Future: China to help Sudan develop East Africa's first nuclear plant

Next Big Future: China to help Sudan develop East Africa's first nuclear plant

Update on Iran’s Stocks of 3.5 Percent Low Enriched Uranium


Update on Iran’s Stocks of 3.5 Percent Low Enriched Uranium

by David Albright
May 23, 2016
Download PDF
http://isis-online.org/isis-reports/detail/update-on-irans-stocks-of-3.5-percent-low-enriched-uranium/#When:16:59:47Z

U.S. Purchase of Iran’s Heavy Water: Encouraging a Dangerous Nuclear Supplier


U.S. Purchase of Iran’s Heavy Water: Encouraging a Dangerous Nuclear Supplier

by David Albright and Andrea Stricker
May 23, 2016
Download PDF
http://isis-online.org/isis-reports/detail/u.s.-purchase-of-irans-heavy-water-encouraging-a-dangerous-nuclear-supplier/#When:15:11:38Z

Safe Closure and Cleanup: International Conference on Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation Opens in Madrid

Safe Closure and Cleanup: International Conference on Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation Opens in Madrid

Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Safety and Security (left),  Juan José Zaballa Gómez, Enresa's President and conference chairperson (centre) and Christophe Xerri, Director of the IAEA Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology (right) addressing the press at the international conference on decommissioning and environmental remediation.  (Photo: J. Donovan/IAEA)
Safe decommissioning of nuclear facilities and remediation of radioactively contaminated sites present major challenges. Recent trends in these two fields will be the focus of an International Conference on Advancing the Global Implementation of Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation Programmes starting today.
“In addition to the technical and safety aspects of decommissioning and environmental remediation, there is also an ethical dimension: generations benefitting from nuclear technologies need to do their best to solve the problems related to decommissioning, remediation and waste management without transferring undue burden to future generations,” said Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security.
Over 500 experts and officials attending the week-long event in Madrid will discuss issues pertaining to the dismantling of nuclear power plants, research and fuel cycle facilities, research reactors and particle accelerators as well as the remediation of former nuclear and industrial sites. These sites include those affected by past uranium mining and processing operations, and by activities involving the use of radioactive material or as a result of a nuclear or radiological accident.
Decommissioning and environmental remediation programmes serve to diminish the possibility of radiation exposure from sites in order to protect people and the environment and thereby make them available for future reuse.
Safe operations for shutdown and cleanup
While some countries have achieved substantial progress, others are still in the process of planning and implementing their decommissioning and environmental remediation programmes. Many nuclear facilities are approaching the end of their operational lives, and contaminated sites due to past nuclear and other industrial activities exist all over the world.
It is essential to recognize the importance of proper decommissioning and environmental remediation not only for addressing the existing issues, but also for the planning of new nuclear facilities and activities in order to minimize the likelihood of contaminated sites being created in the future.
“The decommissioning of nuclear power plants is a major priority for the nuclear industry; it is important to facilitate the exchange of experience between those countries already undertaking decommissioning and those who will need to proceed with decommissioning in the future,” said Mikhail Chudakov, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Energy. “Our projections show that by 2030 there will be more than 150 reactor units needing decommissioning. Already 157 units have been permanently shut down and only about 10% of them have been fully dismantled.”
The remediation of land, soil and groundwater contaminated by radioactive substances also needs to be addressed by countries with such sites. These can encompass a variety of situations, including defence facilities, sites affected by former uranium mining and milling operations, areas affected by nuclear or radiological accidents, past disposal facilities and some sites storing naturally radioactive material used by non-nuclear industries. These sites need to be assessed in order to prioritize the necessary actions to protect the public and the environment.
During the conference, countries will share and review challenges, achievements and lessons learned related to the decommissioning and environmental remediation programmes that have been implemented during the past decade. Key topics include establishing national policies and strategies, regulatory frameworks and standards, technical and technological aspects, optimizing waste and materials management and future needs for international cooperation.
A participant at the IAEA booth at the international conference taking place in Madrid. (Photo: J. Donovan/IAEA)

IAEA: Behind the Scenes: Q&A with a Decommissioner

Behind the Scenes: Q&A with a Decommissioner

Steven Slater, Head of Programme for Site Remediation and Decommissioning Projects at the Sellafield site in the United Kingdom.  (Photo: Sellafield Ltd/UK)
No two days are the same when on the job as a decommissioning manager. Nuclear facilities come in all shapes and sizes, and with each facility having its own unique design, decommissioners have to develop highly detailed and tailored plans and often create new, innovative solutions for safely dismantling a facility piece by piece.
To get an idea of what is involved in a decommissioning manager’s job, we spoke with Steven Slater, Head of the Programme for Site Remediation and Decommissioning Projects at the Sellafield site in the United Kingdom, which is home to several active and shutdown nuclear power and reprocessing facilities, nuclear waste stores, and nuclear research and development laboratories. He is responsible for the safe management and decommissioning of over 150 nuclear facilities and for more than 500 staff across Sellafield.
Some of the decommissioning work I undertake is completely alien to an operator.
Steven Slater, Head, Programme for Site Remediation and Decommissioning Projects, Sellafield Site Ltd, UK
This week's  International Conference on Advancing the Global Implementation of Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation Programmes, in Madrid, Spain, will cover important issues in these two fields. The latest issue of the IAEA Bulletin also deals with this topic. See the full edition here.
How does the job of a decommissioner differ from that of an operator?
I am responsible for the safe maintenance of facilities until we commence decommissioning activities, at which point I am responsible for the safe management of the decommissioning project and removal of the radioactive materials. The main objective of my job is to safely remove any residual radioactive materials after the post-operational clean out phase and make the remaining materials safe for long term disposal.
Some of the decommissioning work I undertake is completely alien to an operator. In my role, I expose the inventory, recover the inventory, and put it into a safe, passive form. For an operator, that would appear to be very alien. The main job of an operator is keeping radioactive materials contained at all times throughout the entire process and lifetime of a nuclear operation.
The key difference between decommissioning and operations is that decommissioning is project-based with a defined start and end point. Operations are process-oriented where you move from one process to another process.
What is the biggest or most significant challenge in your job?
Because of the age of facilities, they are often not as expected in terms of drawings, and legacy issues associated with age-related defects are often a challenge. We would love a facility to be exactly as it is on the drawing, but some of these facilities are almost 50 years old. They have been modified many, many times during those 50 years of use. Our plants are not what we would have expected based on drawings and records. So each time we go into some of these facilities, it’s a voyage of discovery.

In some cases, a decommissioner working manually can be more quick and effective than other options. (Photo: Sellafield Ltd, UK)
How has the decommissioning process changed over the years?
We have moved from fully remote decommissioning to more of a human–machine interface decommissioning. At one time, we got really excited about doing fully remote decommissioning, but fully remote adds a scale, complexity, and cost that can often make it prohibitive. In some instances, you’ve still got to go with fully remote decommissioning, but where there are opportunities, we now do what is called ‘semi-remote decommissioning’, where a person enters an area, sets up the tool and operates it from a remote station. This means the person isn’t in the danger zone, but they are present and available to observe and make modifications as things happen. That has been a real change for us in the last ten years.
The other thing we have done is to move away from wide-area decommissioning to a more tactical decommissioning. Some of these cells and areas are as big as football pitches. In times gone by, we would effectively go into facilities and do a wide scale decommissioning, but in doing this we have faced a spread of contamination throughout the exposed area. Now we opt for more tactical decommissioning where we address one area at a time and put a local containment structure around it, and then move to the next section. This prevents contamination throughout the whole structure. It’s really a more surgical decommissioning method.
What kinds of innovations have you made? How does that fit into the future of this field?
We do innovative things all the time. Recently, we have been developing something called a ‘laser snake’. The laser snake is a flexible robotic arm driven by wire ropes, and can be easily navigated through confined spaces and cluttered environments. The real benefit of this kit is that its toolset enables the ‘arm’ to perform all kinds of activities, from inspection, cleaning to laser cutting. So once the snake is sent through an existing cell penetration, the laser cutting technique allows for easier breakdown of hard-to-reach and often radioactive parts. This prevents any direct contact by the operator, which in turn minimizes a person’s exposure.
We are also working with REACT Engineering, a partner company in our supply chain, together with which we have been developing remote characterization approaches. For example, we have taken a scanning device, attached it to a drone, and flown it into a radioactive cell. In this way, we can then take 3-D pictures of the inside of the cell. We then overlay the radiological map on top, so we can get a clear visual picture of what’s inside a cell before we commit to putting someone to work. It’s part of how we reduce the radiation exposure of our workers.
Drones are used more and more for characterization purposes. In the future, as we start work on some of our more challenging plants and get to the areas where individuals simply cannot be exposed, remote decommissioning techniques and drones will play a much bigger part. I expect technologies like these and other new innovations will continue to evolve and help us find new ways to take on decommissioning and adapt to new challenges.
Where does the IAEA fit into your work and decommissioning?
Sellafield is one of the most hazardous sites in Western Europe in terms of its inventory. We work with many expert peers across the nuclear community, sharing experience and techniques to enhance our decommissioning. The IAEA continues to be a source of support and collaboration for us and others in the field.

Thorium Remix 2016

Thorium Remix 2016

Gordon McDowell has completed and released his two-hour documentary “Thorium Remix 2016” and it is a fantastic introduction to the technology of thorium molten-salt reactors and the LFTR design in particular. Flibe Energy and other MSR developers are mentioned and described. Please enjoy and consider participating in Gordon’s Patreon program!


http://energyfromthorium.com/2016/05/23/thorium-remix-2016/

Germany Runs Up Against the Limits of Renewables

Germany Runs Up Against the Limits of Renewables

Nuclear Plant Containment Failure: Potpourri Dave Lochbaum,

Nuclear Plant Containment Failure: Potpourri

,
http://allthingsnuclear.org/dlochbaum/nuclear-plant-containment-failure-potpourri

Special Nuclear Inspection: River Bend Loss of Shutdown Cooling Dave Lochbaum

Special Nuclear Inspection: River Bend Loss of Shutdown Cooling



http://allthingsnuclear.org/dlochbaum/special-nuclear-inspection-river-bend-loss-of-shutdown-cooling

Iran's Khamenei: U.S. 'Can't Do a Damn Thing' to Curb Missile Program - Breitbart

Iran's Khamenei: U.S. 'Can't Do a Damn Thing' to Curb Missile Program - Breitbart

The US Government is a Crazed Criminal Enterprise That is Pushing the World to Nuclear War | Economy

The US Government is a Crazed Criminal Enterprise That is Pushing the World to Nuclear War | Economy

Strategic Considerations for the Sustainable Remediation of Nuclear Installations

Strategic Considerations for the Sustainable Remediation of Nuclear Installations

Related to ER but with applications in Decommissioning as well.....
http://www.oecd-nea.org/rwm/pubs/2016/7290-strategic-considerations.pdf

EIA: Power sector CO2 emissions would be 25% higher in 2030 without CPP


EIA: Power sector CO2 emissions would be 25% higher in 2030 without CPP

New EIA analysis of the Clean Power Plan finds the US at a crossroads — reductions in carbon emissions are here to stay, but would be less if the greenhouse gas rules are struck down in court.
https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4107653/4107653-6141130337306042368

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

EDF says cannot give timing for UK nuclear investment decision


EDF says cannot give timing for UK nuclear investment decision

http://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-nuclear-britain-e-d-f-idUKKCN0YF0VC

Obama Visits Vietnam to Promote the TPP

Obama Visits Vietnam to Promote the TPP

First New American Nuclear Reactor In 20 Years Turns On | The Daily Caller

First New American Nuclear Reactor In 20 Years Turns On | The Daily Caller

Fukushima nuclear plant missing 600 tonnes of highly radioactive, melted uranium

Fukushima nuclear plant missing 600 tonnes of highly radioactive, melted uranium


http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2016/s4468286.htm

10 Near Misses at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants Considered Precursors to a Meltdown


10 Near Misses at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants Considered Precursors to a Meltdown

http://ecowatch.com/2016/05/24/near-misses-nuclear-plants/

Indian Point and the Mystery of the Missing Bolts




fairewinds_image_1.jpeg
Missing bolts and “nuclear reactor” are words one generally does not want in the same sentence. However, when more than one quarter of the bolts inside an atomic reactor core go missing, the risk and concern multiply.  Listen to this breaking news Fairewinds Energy Education podcast of a formal press conference hosted by Friends of the Earth regarding its Emergency Petition to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to Prohibit Restart of Indian Point Unit 2 and Inspect Indian Point Unit 3.
In this press conference you’ll hear Damon Moglen, Sr. Strategic Advisor with Friends of the Earth, Attorney Richard Ayers, Founder of the the Ayers Law Group, Arnie Gundersen, Chief Engineer with Fairewinds Associates, and David Freeman, former chair of the NY Power Authority, the prior owner of Indian Point Unit 3, and an advisor to Friends of the Earth.
Where are ¼ of Indian Point’s reactor core bolts critical to atomic power safety and why does it matter? http://www.fairewinds.org/podcast//indian-point-and-the-mystery-of-the-missing-bolts-breaking-news

1 Nuclear Near Misses: A Decade of Accident Precursors at U.S. Nuclear Plants


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Nuclear Near Misses:
A Decade of Accident Precursors at U.S. Nuclear Plants

http://www.greenpeace.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/nuclear-near-misses-a-decade-of-accidents-at-us-nuclear-energy-power-plants-may-2016-3mb.pdf?f3025c

38 companies express interest in building mini nuclear power station at Trawsfynydd


38 companies express interest in building mini nuclear power station at Trawsfynydd


http://www.walesonline.co.uk/business/business-news/38-companies-express-interest-building-11376387

NEA 2016 - Preparing for New Reactor Development Live Streaming











NEA 2016 - Preparing for New Reactor Development

This will be a discussion on what it will take for the U.S. to commercialize advanced reactor technology and what changes we should consider making to allow advanced reactors to be licensed here in the U.S.A. Panelists include Maria Korsnick, Jacob DeWitte, John Hopkins, Stephen Kuczynski, Lee McIntire and Cynthia Pezze.


Drilling project stokes nuclear fears

Drilling project stokes nuclear fears


http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2016/05/22/drilling-project-stokes-nuclear-fears/84663884/

Is a Nuclear Revival 15 Years Off? Energy Secretary Moniz Thinks So


Is a Nuclear Revival 15 Years Off? Energy Secretary Moniz Thinks So

https://www.environmentalleader.com/2016/05/24/is-a-nuclear-revival-15-years-off-energy-secretary-moniz-thinks-so/

PM Modi’s US visit 2016: Westinghouse-Toshiba nuclear reactor deal unlikely to be signed

PM Modi’s US visit 2016: Westinghouse-Toshiba nuclear reactor deal unlikely to be signed

Despite intense efforts from both sides, the Westinghouse-Toshiba nuclear reactors deal is not expected to be closed by the time Prime Minister Narendra Modi reaches the US on June 7, at the invitation of US President Barack Obama.



http://www.financialexpress.com/article/economy/n-reactor-deal-unlikely-during-pm-narendra-modis-us-visit/263956/

Germany’s Energiewende: The intermittency problem remains


Germany’s Energiewende: The intermittency problem remains


http://thebulletin.org/germany%E2%80%99s-energiewende-intermittency-problem-remains9469?platform=hootsuite

China to help Sudan develop first nuclear plant

China to help Sudan develop first nuclear plant
China and Sudan have signed a framework agreement for the construction of the east African country's first nuclear power plant. http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/NP-China-to-help-Sudan-develop-first-nuclear-plant-2405164.html

EDF Energy chief refuses to 'prejudge' outcome of HPC talks

EDF Energy chief refuses to 'prejudge' outcome of HPC talks
Vincent de Rivaz, the CEO of EDF Energy, said today he does not want to "prejudge" the outcome of the French-owned company's consultation with the Central Works Council, which needs to be completed before a final investment decision on Hinkley Point C can be made. Giving evidence to the UK parliament's Energy and Climate Change Committee, de Rivaz said the consultation, which began on 2 May, would take at least 60 days. http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/NN-EDF-Energy-chief-refuses-to-prejudge-outcome-of-HPC-talks-24051601.html

Pentagon Report And Chinese Nuclear Forces


Pentagon Report And Chinese Nuclear ForcesAlthough the Pentagon’s latest annual report on Chinese military developments mainly deals with non-nuclear issues, it does contain important new information about China’s current nuclear forces, including ICBM developments, deployment of a new medium-range ballistic missile, submarine capabilities, bomber potential, and a summary of Chinese nuclear policy and strategy. http://fas.org/blogs/security/2016/05/chinareport2016/

Nuclear Energy’s Mixed Bag: New Plants Coming, Some Existing Reactors Closing Early

Nuclear Energy’s Mixed Bag: New Plants Coming, Some Existing Reactors Closing Early



http://www.nei.org/News-Media/Media-Room/News-Releases/Nuclear-Energy-s-Mixed-Bag-New-Plants-Coming,-Some

YUCCA MOUNTAIN NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY STILL TO FACE RESISTANCE AFTER REID RETIREMENT


YUCCA MOUNTAIN NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY STILL TO FACE RESISTANCE AFTER REID RETIREMENT



http://www.bna.com/yucca-mountain-nuclear-b57982072803/

NEI warns more nuclear power plant retirements on the way - Electric Light & Power

NEI warns more nuclear power plant retirements on the way - Electric Light & Power

NUCLEAR: Environmental Progress founder Shellenberger talks shift to nuclear energy advocacy -- Monday, May 23, 2016 -- www.eenews.net

NUCLEAR: Environmental Progress founder Shellenberger talks shift to nuclear energy advocacy -- Monday, May 23, 2016 -- www.eenews.net

Managing financing risks for new nuclear

Managing financing risks for new nuclear


http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/C-Managing-financing-risks-for-new-nuclear-23051601.html

NEA 2016 - Preparing for New Reactor Development


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sR-Q1fseCY&app=desktop

Monday, May 23, 2016

Factbox: Fukushima aftermath in numbers

   Factbox: Fukushima aftermath in numbers
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-05/23/c_135381338.htm

Spotlight: Five years on, Fukushima remains shrouded in untold stories
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-05/23/c_135381192.htm

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentration Has Passed the Point of No Return

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentration Has Passed the Point of No Return


http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/36133-atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-concentration-has-passed-the-point-of-no-return

On the News With Thom Hartmann: More Than 600,000 Miles of Arctic Sea Ice Have Disappeared, and More

On the News With Thom Hartmann: More Than 600,000 Miles of Arctic Sea Ice Have Disappeared, and More



http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/36146-on-the-news-with-thom-hartmann-the-arctic-may-be-ice-free-within-the-next-two-decades-and-more

Fukushima Updates 5/23/19

Fukushima Updates 5/23/19

Rice farming returns to Naraha Town… The freshwater fishing business returns to Miyakoji… Tokyo says most of the remaining Minamisoma evacuation orders could be lifted July 1st… Tokyo wants to begin deep burial of contaminated rural waste and debris later this year… Tokyo will set up a Fukushima worker’s health counselling station near F. Daiichi… Tepco receives another monthly evacuee compensation payment from Tokyo… JAIF posts an interview with Engineering Professor Shigekazu Suzuki of Fukushima College.

http://www.hiroshimasyndrome.com/fukushima-accident-updates.html

YUCCA MOUNTAIN NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY STILL TO FACE RESISTANCE AFTER REID RETIREMENT

YUCCA MOUNTAIN NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY STILL TO FACE RESISTANCE AFTER REID RETIREMENT


http://www.bna.com/yucca-mountain-nuclear-b57982072803/

Why Everyone Needs to #ActForNuclear

Why Everyone Needs to #ActForNuclear


http://neinuclearnotes.blogspot.com/2016/05/why-everyone-needs-to-actfornuclear.html

DOE Summit Raises Urgency of Preserving Existing Nuclear Plants



DOE Summit Raises Urgency of Preserving Existing Nuclear Plants


http://www.nei.org/News-Media/News/News-Archives/DOE-Summit-Raises-Urgency-of-Preserving-Existing-N

Moniz: Closing Nuclear Plants Poses ‘Huge Problem'


Moniz: Closing Nuclear Plants Poses ‘Huge Problem'


http://www.bna.com/moniz-closing-nuclear-n57982072731/

Nuclear: Essential to reaching goals


Nuclear: Essential to reaching goals

http://www.columbiatribune.com/opinion/the_tribunes_view/nuclear-essential-to-reaching-goals/article_12913a1a-4a4d-5959-941d-17b53d01d467.html

The $10 Billion Solution to Climate Change

The $10 Billion Solution to Climate Change


http://fortune.com/2016/05/20/climate-change-nuclear/

TVA sensible to move forward on modular reactors

TVA sensible to move forward on modular reactors


http://www.knoxnews.com/opinion/editorials/tva-sensible-to-move-forward-on-modular-reactors-330d8663-2497-4069-e053-0100007fd1e3-380001651.html

Paul Wilson: Small nuclear reactors will help cut carbon

Paul Wilson: Small nuclear reactors will help cut carbon


http://host.madison.com/wsj/opinion/column/paul-wilson-small-nuclear-reactors-will-help-cut-carbon/article_cf507ff0-fd82-567a-9f93-02e40480b696.html

Chinese AP1000 fuel line moves to production

Chinese AP1000 fuel line moves to production
Construction has been completed of China's first production line for the manufacture of fuel for AP1000 reactors. The new production line is to make two sets of dummy assemblies ahead of full production.http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/UF-Chinese-AP1000-fuel-line-moves-to-production-2305164.html

Managing financing risks for new nuclear

Managing financing risks for new nuclear
Developers of new nuclear power plants can draw on the experience of other large-scale infrastructure projects to help identify and reduce financing risks, a senior corporate banker told delegates at a recent conference.http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/C-Managing-financing-risks-for-new-nuclear-23051601.html

Watts Bar Unit 2 operates under own power for first time

Watts Bar Unit 2 operates under own power for first time

http://newschannel9.com/news/local/watts-bar-unit-2-operates-under-own-power-for-first-time

Real People Are Harmed When Other People Decide to Close Nuclear Plants

Real People Are Harmed When Other People Decide to Close Nuclear Plants
http://www.theenergycollective.com/rodadams/2378969/real-people-are-harmed-when-other-people-decide-to-close-nuclear-plants-2?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29

A Bipartisan U.S. Climate Policy. Crazy? Here’s What It Could Look Like


A Bipartisan U.S. Climate Policy. Crazy? Here’s What It Could Look Like

http://www.theenergycollective.com/energy-post/2378971/a-bipartisan-u-s-climate-policy-crazy-heres-what-it-could-look-like?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Energy+Collective+%28all+posts%29